Is the Freshman 15 a Myth or a Reality?

Kendall Sienon, Staff Writer

Wingate, N.C. — Going into college, people are warned relentlessly about the potential of the dreaded freshman 15. During freshman orientation, they bring up the possibility of weight gain and how to combat it. All over social media, there are countless articles on tips on how to avoid gaining weight in college. But how prevalent is this claim?

Moving from your hometown into college is a big transition. You’re in a new environment with new people. The food is different and there is temptation to go out to eat with friends especially late at night. A lot of times exercise seems to be the last thing on the list to do.

Senior Lauren Register says the freshman 15 is normal. “The body has a difficult time adapting to the new living arrangements,” Lauren states. Lauren noticed significant weight gain her freshman year. “My eating choices weren’t the best and the food offered at school aren’t always the healthiest.” Throughout college, Lauren has learned to eat healthier and workout regularly to avoid any significant weight gain.

Although working out and being active may not be the only solution to avoid weight gain. Freshman Sierra Street on the Women’s Lacrosse Team noticed weight gain because of the heavy lifting and increased appetite. “I feel like I am in shape,” Street states, “being an athlete has helped me maintain weight but if you eat the right things, you’ll gain muscle mass and that’s not always a bad thing.”

However, males are equally as affected by this potential increased weight gain in the first year . Junior Chris Birozes noticed weight gain among his non-athlete, male friends here at school and from home.

Although he is an athlete and didn’t notice weight gain for himself, he believes there is strong correlation between weight gain and time management. “I think the freshman 15 comes when there is no balance between school, friends, working out, sleeping and extra curriculars,” said Birozes.

Die Reich, Director of Campus Recreation, suggests that students remain active throughout their college career. She strongly suggests taking advantage of the Campus Recreation’s programs and services and the new fitness center.

Furthermore, poor eating and portion size can definetly affect lots of students. “Portion size can be the biggest culprit in weight gain,” says Reich. She suggests writing down what you eat and if possible how much. By using fitness trackers like My Fitness Pal, it can give you nutritional information, calories, and other important information on fitness and healthy eating.

The dreaded freshman 15 may be prevalent on campuses all over the country but there are ways to combat it through healthy eating, exercise and being aware of the risk.

Photo source: Google images

Edited by: Brea Childs

Students react to Starbucks coming to Campus in the Fall Semester

Mason Teague, Staff Writer

New dining changes are coming to Wingate University with the announcement of a Starbucks being added on campus. The popular coffee chain will be located inside the Dickson-Palmer Center on campus, where it will replace the recreation facilities that currently occupy the space.

The Starbucks on campus will be as large as any Starbucks found all over the world, with a full dining area, espresso and condiment stations for servers to brew customer orders and a kitchen area where supplies will be stored as needed by the employees.

The plan also includes a stage found in one area of the coffee shop, to be used during open mic nights that will occur throughout the school year to provide entertainment to customers.

President Rhett Brown seems excited about the plans to bring Starbucks back to the Wingate student body. “We actually used to have a Starbucks on campus where Einstein Bros is now, and it was a big hit with the students on campus,” Dr. Brown said. “The administration is extremely excited to bring such a popular restaurant back to campus so that students and faculty alike will be able to enjoy all of the services they have to offer.”

The excitement about a Starbucks on campus has spread to many of the students on campus. Abbey Gantt, a pharmacy student at Wingate, is excited about having her favorite coffee shop on campus soon.

“I am really happy that I won’t have to drive super far away from campus just to get my favorite coffee,” Ms. Gantt said. “Soon I will be be in walking distance of a Starbucks, which is super convenient for me because of my busy class schedule.”

Maria Sofia, a junior at Wingate, is also thrilled about the plans for a Starbucks on campus because of the options that they offer for people that do not consume dairy.

“It is hard for me to get coffee at Einstein’s because of the dairy products that they typically use in their coffees,” Ms. Sofia said. “Starbucks offers all sorts of coffee options that I am able to drink without these products, which is why I am excited they are coming to campus.”

While many students are happy about this plan, some are concerned about the high costs on the Starbucks menu.

“I really hope that we are going to be able to use our Bulldog Bucks to pay for stuff at Starbucks,” Isaac Tilghman said. “Otherwise, I won’t be able to go extremely often because of the prices being so high.”

Dr. Brown offered no comment on whether Bulldog Bucks could be used when Starbucks opens, as the school is still in the process of deciding what types of payment methods will be accepted.

Construction on the restaurant will begin near the end of the spring semester, with an opening scheduled for the beginning of the 2017 school year in the fall.

Photo Source: Starbucks Newsroom
Edited by: Brea Childs

Wingate University Celebrates Women’s History Month with debut of Maya Angelou documentary

Nick Anta, Staff Writer

Wingate University kicked off Women’s History month Tuesday by screening Maya Angelou’s documentary, “And Still I Rise” with a discussion lead by producer/co-director Rita Coburn Whack.

large_mayaangelou-poster
Photo source: Rogerebert.com

The film, which took over 6 years to make, showed a very intimate side of the singer, dancer, author, producer, playwright, poet and civil rights activist.

Mrs. Whack admitted that she felt “drawn to Maya” at a very young age. “I remember reading this book of poetry with a black woman on the back. I remember because it was the first time I’d ever seen a black author on the back of a book, let alone a woman” said Mrs. Whack.

She had begun sending candles and letters to Angelou’s representatives around that time in an attempt to show her how much of an impact she had. “As cheesy as it sounds, I’d go pick out these little candles and write her letters talking about how much she influenced me and my little lines of poetry along with them” said Mrs. Whack.

Years later, she would get her chance to finally interview Maya Angelou, while working for the Oprah Winfrey show. She wouldn’t know it at the time, but that was the start of a relationship that would ultimately allow her to complete the documentary, years later.

“That interview, along with a few other times that we met, showed Maya that she could trust me. That I wasn’t out to make a buck” said Mrs. Whack. The documentary proved the trust, as Maya gave details about past marriages, the feelings she had on her son’s possible paralysis, the assassination of MLK and many other sensitive topics.

Ultimately, the lyceum event left many students with feelings of admiration for the accomplishments of Maya, a woman of color in the civil rights era. “It was really powerful to see how she could accomplish all of that after being abandoned by her real family and sent away” said Zarron Harvey, a Senior at Wingate University.

“I think she’s a great example of just how much a woman can accomplish if she fights through what life throws at her” said Katie Bludau, a Junior at Wingate University.

The documentary will be airing on PBC intermittently throughout the month of March and will be available for purchase soon.  

Edited By: Brea Childs

Food Recovery Network founder sheds light on Food Waste and Ugly Produce

Sydney Walker, Staff Writer

Wingate, N.C. – “Food waste is not one problem, but a collection of hundreds of problems that need to be solved–especially if the growing population wants to be fed,” said Ben Simon to Wingate University students. “The only way to feed the estimated 9 billion people in 2050 is to reduce the amount of food waste. Reducing just 15% of food waste could feed 25 million Americans.”

Ben+Simon+Headshot+Nov2013
Photo source: Food Recovery Network

Ben Simon, the CEO of Imperfect and the founder of the Food Recovery Network, first realized how much food was wasted in his college’s cafeteria. “At 9 p.m. just before closing, there would be stations full of food,” Simon said.

Simon asked a friend who worked in the dining hall what happened to all of that food. He found out it was just thrown away. This sparked the Food Recovery Network. The Food Recovery Network “is the largest student movement against hunger and food waste,” Simon said.

It wasn’t until Simon got a segment on the Melissa Perry Harris show that the Food Recovery Network took off. “That day and week we got applications from college students to spread the program to other campuses,” Simon said. “Starting this program locally with friends and growing it to a larger size is one of the greatest experience I’ve ever had.”

Simon said that is the government’s goal to reduce food waste by 50% before 2030. About 40% of food is wasted per year which is about 197 million pounds of produce. Simon said most of this food is wasted on farms because they are too ugly.

“Cauliflower that has a slight yellowing to it from the sun aren’t even considered for market. Heaven forbid the sun shines on produce and gives it a little sun tan,” Simon joked. “Let’s sell some ugly produce and love imperfections.”

Simon’s company Imperfect has about 15,000 to 16,000 subscribers in CA where they originated. The subscribers receive a box of ugly produce to their doorstep.

Simon was a government and politician major in college. He encouraged students to get involved with different student organizations. “I’m doing something completely unrelated to my major because of different student organizations. I found myself through work outside of my major,” he said.

Freshman Erin November said “I found it interesting that he was a government student like myself but changed paths. It makes me think about what I can do to improve situations on campus dealing with food waste and environmental studies.”

Freshman Katie Garrett said “it was very inspiring that he could start his own company at such a young age and be so successful.” Simon said fighting food waste can help with hunger problems. “One in six Americans struggle with food insecurities,” he said.

Garrett said she found the statistics shocking. “We could easily fix our hunger problem if we weren’t concerned with a standard of how things should look in advertising,” she said.

Edited by: Brea Childs

A Review on the new PlayStation 4 game Horizon: Zero Dawn

Danny Stueber, Staff Writer

Horizon: Zero Dawn, Sony’s newest PlayStation 4 exclusive, takes little pieces from other open world games and improves upon all of them. As a result, it feels like a breath of fresh air in the genre. There are some minor hiccups along the 30-40-hour journey but overall the game shines in every sense of the word.

Presentation

The setting is that of a post apocalyptic world where humanity ended over a thousand years ago due to an unknown cause. The planet has over grown what used to be cities and towns so the entire landscape is skyscrapers and vehicles overgrown with wild life.

The humans that are around, now live in tribes like the Native Americans and survive with bows and spears in the ruins of ancient cities, in which they think it was all created by a god they call “All Mother” but you as the player knows that the buildings in the city they are exploring, are actually banks or car washes.

It is bizarre and not a setting I have ever seen before in any kind of media to where it held my attention through the whole thing. Finding treasures referred to as “ancient bracelets” but knowing it’s just a Rolex watch was always amusing to me.

Oh, and I forgot to mention, the entire world is inhabited by robotic animals ranging from deer like creatures all the way to tyrannosaurus rexes. Just a small detail I left out. You have to survive against these robotic creatures with nothing but primitive weapons which hooked me in even more.

The design of the world and the characters were also amazing. It is without a doubt the most beautiful game on any console system to date. It even included a photo taking mode for you to take screen shots in the game.

I found myself multiple times stopping to look at the environment not believing this was on a console and not a high-end PC. Menus were designed nicely, the creatures all were distinct and creative looking to where you could tell which was which from a far distance, and just over all it’s a marvelously designed game that never even really had any hiccups in framerate or performance.

I will lament however that in the middle of the final cut scene of the whole game it made my console crash to where I had to reboot it and do the fight before it all over again. Overall that was the only problem I had with the game.

Gameplay

You play as Aloy (meant to sound like the word alloy because metal and such ha-ha so funny), a girl who was cast out from her tribe at birth and grew up without a family. She trains her whole life though to enter the Proving, a passage for those who want to enter the tribe and if she places first among the other young adults she is granted one request.

Her request is to know who her mother is and why she was outcast and if she wins she is guaranteed answers. For any other game, that would be the whole plot but this is only about 10% of the game. The story goes places and passes all expectations.

By the end of the game it even wraps up which most big budget games don’t do know anymore since they want to push sequels. It was just an overall nice experience. The gameplay revolves around side and main missions where you mainly fight the robotic beats for resources and experience.

Each monster has different weaknesses that you learn how to exploit; making each fight unique. The combat flows very well and was always a fun. I admit though that the healing mechanic was awful. You could carry health drinks but by later on in the game there were not enough to heal you all the way.

Other than that, you could collect plants to heal you whenever needed, but when those ran out you would have to spend a lot of time running around the world crouching down to pick flowers and such. It slowed the game down and really was a boring roadblock.

Another problem I had with gameplay was the feeling of progression. Whenever you leveled up you got 10 more health points and the ability to choose a new skill like slowing down time when shooting arrows or being able to roll farther.

You never felt like you were getting stronger though, since your spear is the same from the first chapter to the last and your weapons, while upgradable with coils and such, never really did much more damage.

If you’re not hitting weak points your just shooting pointy sticks at a robotic alligator and you feel that at level 1 or level 50 you never really got much better at shooting those pointy sticks at those alligators. Other than that, though and needing to hunt for resources a little too often I loved the combat.

I mentioned that this takes open world elements from other games and improves them which it does in every sense of the word. It takes tower climbing, which is used to gain more layout for your map, and makes you only climb four towers, which are moving robotic giraffes.

Tower climbing in some games can be in the dozens and are no fun at all but making it a minimal activity while also making the tower itself interesting made it a great experience. Another thing is clearing out bandit camps to use for fast travel locations and for people to set up shops.

In other games, there are far too many and do nothing in the grand scheme of things but in Horizon there is only a handful and clearing each camp is part of a story mission with one of the most interesting characters in the game.

So many things like this Horizon gets right where other games have failed since they just wanted filler content to pad the asking price. Horizon doesn’t waste your time and instead makes sure your having fun during every step of the process.

Conclusion

Horizon is one of my favorite open world games I have ever played. The environment and setting are like nothing you have ever seen, the gameplay is fast and fun while also being strategic, and the main character has a great arc from being a homeless child to finding out why the world is the way it is.

It’s also a special game in the sense of having a female character in the lead and not just another buzz cut, muscle head like companies always assume will help sell a game. Aloy is an amazing character that can show young girls that not all games are for men or center around men. I’m glad to see her step up in such a male dominated genre. The game stands out on every level with its story-telling and its amazing protagonist to where even though I had some problems with the progression and some performances here and there, I will still remember this game for a long time.

Horizon: Zero Dawn = 9.5/10

Danny Stueber

Photo source: Gamespot

Edited by: Brea Childs

 

 

Senior Graduation List for May 2017

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Vincent Aiello Centereach, NY

Criminal Justice

 

Kristie L. Begley Indian Trail, NC

Psychology

 

Kaitlyn Brunworth Littleton, CO

Biology

 

Joseph S. Carter Durham, NC

Management

 

Devontae Alonza Cash* Chesterfield, SC

Music

 

Jennifer Michelle Earp Traphill, NC

English

 

Arte Michael Elliott Monroe, NC

Music

 

Jennifer Andrea Escalante Charlotte, NC

Psychology and Criminal Justice

 

Anthony Johan Thomas Gaudin* Orleans, France

Political Science

 

Austin Bailey Greeson Burlington, NC

Religious Studies

 

Emma Meaghan Hatfield* Hickory, NC

Communication Studies

 

Ronald Carl James, Jr. Rockingham, NC

Religious Studies

 

Alexandra Grayson King Cary, NC

Communication Studies

 

Zachary Ross Lewis Hickory, NC

History

 

 

Keyua Nicole McElveen Lexington, NC

Communication Studies

 

Russell Wesley Moore China Grove, NC

Music Performance

 

Jose Giuseppe Ramirez Charlotte, NC

Finance

 

Steven Blake Ramsey Monroe, NC

History

 

Sophia Christine Rinkert Mooresville, NC

English Education

 

Hope Courtney Rogers Asheville, NC

Communication Studies

 

Callum Joseph Ross Newcastle, England

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Finance

 

Tyler Charles Schofer Graham, NC

Communication Studies

 

Andrea C. Ternera Cardona Bogotá, Colombia

Management

 

Sarah Luise Towner Gastonia, NC

Music Performance

 

Athanette Mari Tucker Greensboro, NC

Psychology

 

Ryan Vogrig Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Marketing

 

Dayshawn Andre Welch Bronx, NY

Psychology

 

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Bachelor of Music Education

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Mica Elise Cline Apex, NC

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Grant Andrews Logan Hickory, NC

Taylor Marie McNure Shelby, NC

 

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Justice Luke Aheron Stoneville, NC

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Kira Nicole Aiken Concord, NC

History

 

Katelynne Lorine Anderson Marietta, OH

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Olivia Anderson Raleigh, NC

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Emily Caroline Andrew Albemarle, NC

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Brittany Ann Andrews* Bel Air, MD

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Nicholas Paul Anta Hope Mills, NC

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Tyler Antram Brooklin, Ontario, Canada

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Diego Ygor Alonso Castillo-Navarro Callao, Peru

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Max Olivier Cleophat

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Alexander James Dewalt* Charlotte, NC

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Ryan Martez Dilworth Indian Trail, NC

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Ian Scott Fabian* Fountain Inn, SC

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Austin Flowe* Monroe, NC

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Andre Foulks York, SC

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Nikisha Francis Wingate, NC

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Macy Franklin Conover, NC

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Rodney C. Gillis, Jr.  Brooklyn, NY

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Terry Keith Griffin, Jr. Charlotte, NC

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Sara Elizabeth Gunter* Huntersville, NC

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Donald Verner Horn III* Mount Pleasant, NC

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Heather Iris Horne Marshville, NC

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Kimberly N. Hubbard Monroe, NC

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Nathan Eugene Huntley Indian Trail, NC

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Morgan Elizabeth Insel Plantation, FL

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Francesca Necole James Bolton, NC

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Alyssa Nicole Johnson San Jose, CA

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Katie Margaret Danielle Johnson Pikeville, NC

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Whitney Nicole Johnson* Greensboro, NC

Political Science

 

JaShawn Tyrice Joyner Winston Salem, NC

Psychology

 

Leah Cohen Joyner Locust, NC

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Richard Aksel Juul Newcastle, England

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Erika Kaspersson Eslöv, Sweden

Marketing

 

Megan Ariel Katz Fort Mill, SC

Communication Studies

 

Laura Elizabeth Kearns Monroe, NC

Management and Human Services

 

Danyelle Marie Keenan Charlotte, NC

Environmental Biology

 

Sarah Anne Kelly Waxhaw, NC

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Ryan Andrew Kennedy Monroe, NC

Mathematics

 

Alexander Charles King* Cherryville, NC

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Casey E. King Washington, NC

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Bailey Marie Kiser Wingate, NC

Reading Education

 

Leif-Henning Kluever Risum-Lindholm Schleswig-Holstein Germany

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Jory J. Knight Marshville, NC

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Olga Kosheleva Yekaterinburg, Russia

Psychology

 

Tanner Benjamin Kotch Butler, PA

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Joseph Kroeger Indian Trail, NC

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Gabriel Sekou Kromah Brooklyn Center, MN

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Jonathan Laughton Beaufort, NC

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Sydney Lautzenheiser Cornelius, NC

Exercise Science

 

Jennifer Ann LeBlanc Geneseo, IL

Mathematics Education

 

Ashley Lauren Ledbetter Monroe, NC

Psychology

 

Elizabeth D. Letteer Monroe, NC

Accounting

 

Martha Lopez Monroe, NC

Biology

 

Richard Lawrence Lower III* Apex, NC

Communication Studies

 

Alexander Nathaniel Manzewitsch Stanfield, NC

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Aysha Esfandiara Marshall* Charlotte, NC

Human Services

 

Hannah Leigh Martin Virginia Beach, VA

Psychology

 

Naomi Cynthia Matley Powell, OH

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Veronica Ann Matyjaszczyk Monroe, NC

Psychology

 

Hunter Scott McCorkle Charlotte, NC

Management

 

Trevor Lee McKenzie Ocean Isle Beach, NC

Mathematics

 

Adrian James McMiller, Jr.* Harrisonburg, VA

Biology

 

Charlie Alfonso McVay, Jr. Charlotte, NC

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Georgia Blair Melby Sanford, NC

Political Science

 

Rae Lynn Moore Monroe, NC

Human Services

 

Juan Morales Gastonia, NC

Biology

 

Austin Murphy Orillia, Ontario Canada

Sport Management

 

Shelby Nassar Waxhaw, NC

Biology

 

Morgan Brooke Neher Sedalia, CO

Biology

 

Kristen Leigh Neitz Franklin, NC

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Alex Nelson Newcastle, England

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Alexander Elliott Norton Charlotte, NC

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Jacob Michael Ormerod Lake Mary, FL

Biology

 

Victoria Summer Parks Belmont, NC

Criminal Justice and Sociology

 

Sierra Parsons Toronto Ontario, Canada

Sociology

 

Anthony Lee-Ma Pate Wingate, NC

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Jamie Lynn Paul East Hartford, CT

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Taylor Nicole Paxton Troutman, NC

Athletic Training

 

Filippo Pezzoli Milan Lombardy, Italy

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Chandler Alan Phillips Lutz, FL

Finance

 

Macy Lynn Phillips Cliffside, NC

Biology

 

Sloane Michelle Poindexter Tobaccoville, NC

Communication Studies

 

Adam James Preslar Albemarle, NC

Mathematics

 

Déjà Monét Prince Winston Salem, NC

Sociology

 

Matthew Ryan Quick Laurinburg, NC

Biology 3+1

 

Patrick Ryan Quinn Marietta, GA

Accounting

 

Karla Liliana Rangel Silva Charlotte, NC

Biology

 

Lauren Katie Register China Grove, NC

Accounting

 

Cassandra Jade Rhodes Rockingham, NC

Athletic Training

 

Andrew Wallace Rhyne Monroe, NC

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Suzanna Christine Ricard Greensboro, NC

Finance

 

Keith Manning Rivenbark Kannapolis, NC

Criminal Justice and Sociology

 

MarChavis Shaquille Rivers* Monroe, NC

Psychology

 

Susan Elaine Roets Laurinburg, NC

Human Services

 

Petter Mawad William Rophael Fort Mill, SC

Biology

 

Briona Rhenee Rushing Monroe, NC

Human Services

 

Matthew Jeffrey Russell Monroe, NC

Business Mathematics

 

Abigail Ruth Saehler Iowa City, IA

Human Services

 

Anas Amadu Salifu Accra, Ghana

Chemistry Business

 

Michaela Sanchez de la Cruz Statesville, NC

Psychology

 

Robert Paul Serrano Matthews, NC

Management

 

Rebecca Leigh Shaw* Indian Trail, NC

Communication Studies

 

Amber Noel Shields Weddington, NC

Human Services

 

Kendall Shaw Sienon Woodstock, GA

Communication Studies

 

Aria Skye Smith Fremont, CA

Communication Studies

 

Courtney Allison Smith* Raeford, NC

Biology

 

Devin Ryan Smith* Wadesboro, NC

Management

 

Kaylah Ashley Smith Wingate, NC

Human Services

 

Maggie Victoria Smith Monroe, NC

Communication Studies

 

Olivia Kathryn Smith Chesapeake, VA

Athletic Training

 

Tyler Marie Smith Aiken, SC

Communication Studies

 

Eumika Quenyana Spaulding-Tillman Mint Hill, NC

Chemistry Business

 

Courtney Gayle Springer Albemarle, NC

Elementary Education

 

Lauren Mackenzie Starnes Monroe, NC

Human Services

 

Daniel Francies Stueber Matthews, NC

Communication Studies

 

Laura Ann Swanson Plantation, FL

Finance

 

Alex Xavier Taylor Chesapeake, VA

Communication Studies

 

Bryson G. Taylor Charlotte, NC

Political Science

 

Megan Louise Taylor Cambridge, England

Psychology

 

Sophie A. Terry Willow Spring, NC

Marketing

 

Gabriel J. Thamm* Matthews, NC

Mathematics

 

Dwalla Lynise Thomas* Charlotte, NC

Psychology

 

Zuri Jendell Thomas Aberdeen, NC

Human Services

 

Richard Thomason Waynesville, NC

Marketng

 

Andrew Lee Thompson Charlotte, NC

Marketing

 

Austin Shane Thompson Monroe, NC

Environmental Biology

 

Destiny Marie Todd Fort Mill, SC

Biology

 

Alexandra Paige Tomlinson Raleigh, NC

Criminal Justice

 

Brenda Liz Torré Santiago Carolina, Puerto Rico

Human Services

 

Catherine Maureen Toste Raynham, MA

Biology

 

Shelby Lyn Tricoli Waynesville, NC

Finance

 

Kathryn Mary Noelle Trimble Shelby, NC

Accounting

 

Jacob Preston Troutman Aberdeen, NC

Chemistry and Mathematics

 

Jenna Christine Turner Waxhaw, NC

Communication Studies

 

Dessence Waddell* Pinehurst, NC

Exercise Science

 

Douglas Kassan Waddell, Jr. Tallahassee, FL

Management

 

Ashley Nicole Wadford Garner, NC

Human Services

 

Taylor Ann Walker Trinity, NC

Finance

 

Jacob McCoy Ward Marion, NC

Criminal Justice and Human Services

 

Tucker Stanton Warren Murfreesboro, NC

Accounting

 

Jared Todd Waters Mooresville, NC

Management

 

Jessika Stefani Weiss Macon, GA

Accounting

 

Megan Elizabeth Widener Monroe, NC

Community and Commercial Recreation

 

Jordan Shea Wilson Belmont, NC

Middle Grades Education

 

Joshua Patrick Wilson Middletown, DE

Criminal Justice

 

Tasha Karie Wilson Zionville, NC

Athletic Training

 

Linsey Leigh Winchester* Monroe, NC

Human Services

 

Victoria Blake Winstead Roxboro, NC

Accounting

 

Trista Megan Yow Davidson, NC

Biology

 

Mehdi Zeraidi Brussels, Belgium

Finance

 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Anna Jean Barbee Stanfield, NC

Logan Aleksandra Bounds Salisbury, NC

Heather Michelle Bowman Madison, NC

John Robert DeLuca Bahama, NC

Susannah LaPrairie Glaeser New Bern, NC

Chelsea Maria Grant Charlotte, NC

Jose Refugio Jauregui Monroe, NC

Claudia Alejandra Ochoa Tello Indian Trail, NC

Maureen Namuki Simiyu Kapenguria, Kenya

Elsy Luz Solis Rivera Wingate, NC

Kathryn Stewart Autryville, NC

Amber Lynnette Williams Sachse, TX

 

Bachelor of Liberal Studies

 

Thomas James Biggs Indian Trail, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Angela McCoy Bost Charlotte, NC

Human Services

 

Sylvia Denice Bostick* Fayetteville, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Lawanda McMiller Brown Charlotte, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Barbara McCall Dement* Matthews, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Alyssa E. Edwards Flemington, NJ

Human Services & Organizational Communication and Management

 

Mary Nelson Edwards Monroe, NC

Organizational Communication and Management & Human Services

 

Zachary Thomas Evans* Charlotte, NC

Organizational Communication and Management & Human Services

 

 

Christopher Kinney Gray Charlotte, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Tony L. James Monroe, NC

Human Services

 

Janae Laury Seattle, WA

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Jennifer Louise Millmann Charlotte, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Noemi Perkins Monroe, NC

Human Services

 

Monica Rivera-McCorkle* Charlotte, NC

Human Services

 

Aneiko R. Smith* Monroe, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Joseph Damien Wallace, II Fayetteville, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

 

Lanetta McBride White* Pageland, SC

Human Services & Organizational Communication and Management

 

David James Wilkins Charlotte, NC

Organizational Communication and Management

Edited by: Brea Childs

Looking Back at Wingate’s Basketball Season

Alex Taylor, Staff Writer

The Bulldogs had successful and thrilling basketball campaigns this season, on both the men’s and women’s teams. The men’s basketball team performed well throughout the regular season and entered the South Atlantic Conference (SAC) and NCAA Division 2 tournaments with complete confidence.

Their quarter final win over sixth seeded Catawba, 91-85, was the highlight of their SAC games. Senior forward Josh Dominguez led the bulldogs with 22 points and six assists, helping them win the game in overtime from a 13-point deficit.

At that point, the Bulldogs held a record of 20-9 overall and advanced to the SAC semifinals against the second-seeded Queens University Royals. In the SAC semi-finals, Wingate was eliminated from the competition by a crushing defeat to the Royals, losing 79-51.

The two teams faced each other again in the first round of the NCAA Southeast Regional tournament, where Wingate was the eighth-seeded team. Josh Dominguez led the Bulldogs with 27 points, a steal, and two blocks but they were unable to combat the Royals’ precise shooting (17 threes on 58.6 % shooting). The game concluded with a final score of 80-96, ending Wingate season at 20-11 overall.

Wingate’s women’s basketball team also had an outstanding season and were seeking to win another consecutive SAC title when they entered the tournament. Wingate opened the tournament with a victory against Lenoir-Rhyne, 56-46.

Junior Center Marta Miscenko got her 14th double-double, scoring 16 points and picking up 11 rebounds. Sophomore guard Caroline Averette also scored doubled digits, snagging 15 points for Wingate.

The Wingate Women soared through the tournament and easily into the semi-finals grabbing a nail-biting victory from Catawba, 57-54. The finals were held in Mount Airy where Wingate wrapped up the tournament with swift victory.

Senior forward Kristina Rumplasch was the top scorer in the SAC final for a second year in a row with 21 points, leading her teammates to an 81-61 victory over the top-seeded Lincoln Memorial. With their ninth SAC championship title, Wingate’s record extended to 25-5 overall.

The Bulldogs entered the NCAA Division II tournament the second-seeded team and progressed through until the second round.  In the first round, they grabbed a huge victory against King University, 75-55, with five players scoring in the double digits.

Senior guard Shelby Tricoli scored a game-high 18 points, sinking four of four three point shots. The Bulldogs fell in the second round with an 85-66 defeat to Lincoln Memorial, ending their season at 26-6 overall.

Both head coaches felt their teams performed well and achieved far more than what was asked.  Head Coach Brian Good stated that the majority of the season was an uphill battle for the men’s team and he was impressed at how they all stepped up to their responsibilities.

His current focus for the team is scouting new players and improving their overall shooting percentage. “We could have easily just went away, not hang in there or be competitive but our guys really impressed me with how tough they were mentally and physically and found a way to get back in the mix of things and ultimately a NCAA bid after a 3-7 start is something they should be very proud of,” said Coach Good.

Head Women’s Basketball Coach, Ann Hancock, felt the season was successful and her players heightened their performance throughout the tournaments. Her focus for the team is training the new recruits and getting players to fill the responsibilities of the five seniors who will be leaving.

When referring to the five seniors who are graduating Coach Hancock said, “I’m happy for them because 26-6 and three rings is not a bad way to end your last season.  They won the championship their freshman, junior, and senior year. They were an outstanding group and lot fun to coach, so I was very pleased.”

Photo source Wingate University Athletics

Edited By: Brea Childs