Category Archives: Lyceum

Library holds program on plagiarism for Academic Integrity Week

Dustin Kiggins, Staff Writer

In recognition of Academic Integrity Week on Wednesday, librarians from Ethel K. Library presented students with tips on how to avoid plagiarism when doing research and writing papers for class and future careers.

The presenters showed examples to students on plagiarism in music to see if the students understood the difference between what was and wasn’t plagiarized. This was so they had an idea of what to look for when presented with a written work.

“Music is different because there are only a few beat patterns that are used a lot,” said Amee Odem, a Wingate librarian. “If you are doing a parody of a song that is fine but if you want to use someone else’s song in part or entirely you must ask for permission first and pay royalties.”

The ability to properly cite other works when writing is important because it gives proper credit to the author of the original work.

“You need to treat citations as a conversation that you’re having with others,” said Kevin Winchester, director of the writing center. “When you cite works and then write your own you are joining the conversation and then contributing to it by writing your own  that will one day be cited as a source in another work.”

With citations you can also trace back the history of cited works and find things that you may have never seen before.

“Citation chaining is a neat trick where you can jump from one work to the next just by following their works cited sources,” Winchester said. “I’ve spent hours just going through other works to see all of the other works that someone else already cited.”

In order to emphasize the importance of citing, the presenters told several stories about people who didn’t properly cite their works and it ended their career. Odom told the story of Joseph Netti and Anil Potti who fabricated research data collected during their cancer study.

“The cancer society had funded their project at Duke University and they were fabricating data,” Odom said. “They were conducting studies with data that wasn’t properly verified and cited which was a problem since they were conducting studies on patients.”

This led to Duke University and the researchers to lose all scientific credibility that they once had. “Use this as an example as to what can happen if you don’t use proper citation methods.” Winchester chimed in.

The presenters advised students that changing one word in a portion of a work or using outside sources need to be cited.

“If you use anything from another work that is a direct quote, summary or paraphrase you need to cite it,” Winchester said. “There needs to be a path of search results showing you cited your work properly. The best thing to do is to keep a running citation of all the works you used in a paper,” Winchester said, “along with a bibliography of all the sources that you may have considered to ensure you aren’t plagiarizing.”
A representative of the honor council noted that when it comes to plagiarism, ignorance isn’t bliss.

Photo Source: Al Young

Edited by: Brea Childs

Wingate University Celebrates Women’s History Month with debut of Maya Angelou documentary

Nick Anta, Staff Writer

Wingate University kicked off Women’s History month Tuesday by screening Maya Angelou’s documentary, “And Still I Rise” with a discussion lead by producer/co-director Rita Coburn Whack.

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Photo source: Rogerebert.com

The film, which took over 6 years to make, showed a very intimate side of the singer, dancer, author, producer, playwright, poet and civil rights activist.

Mrs. Whack admitted that she felt “drawn to Maya” at a very young age. “I remember reading this book of poetry with a black woman on the back. I remember because it was the first time I’d ever seen a black author on the back of a book, let alone a woman” said Mrs. Whack.

She had begun sending candles and letters to Angelou’s representatives around that time in an attempt to show her how much of an impact she had. “As cheesy as it sounds, I’d go pick out these little candles and write her letters talking about how much she influenced me and my little lines of poetry along with them” said Mrs. Whack.

Years later, she would get her chance to finally interview Maya Angelou, while working for the Oprah Winfrey show. She wouldn’t know it at the time, but that was the start of a relationship that would ultimately allow her to complete the documentary, years later.

“That interview, along with a few other times that we met, showed Maya that she could trust me. That I wasn’t out to make a buck” said Mrs. Whack. The documentary proved the trust, as Maya gave details about past marriages, the feelings she had on her son’s possible paralysis, the assassination of MLK and many other sensitive topics.

Ultimately, the lyceum event left many students with feelings of admiration for the accomplishments of Maya, a woman of color in the civil rights era. “It was really powerful to see how she could accomplish all of that after being abandoned by her real family and sent away” said Zarron Harvey, a Senior at Wingate University.

“I think she’s a great example of just how much a woman can accomplish if she fights through what life throws at her” said Katie Bludau, a Junior at Wingate University.

The documentary will be airing on PBC intermittently throughout the month of March and will be available for purchase soon.  

Edited By: Brea Childs

Food Recovery Network founder sheds light on Food Waste and Ugly Produce

Sydney Walker, Staff Writer

Wingate, N.C. – “Food waste is not one problem, but a collection of hundreds of problems that need to be solved–especially if the growing population wants to be fed,” said Ben Simon to Wingate University students. “The only way to feed the estimated 9 billion people in 2050 is to reduce the amount of food waste. Reducing just 15% of food waste could feed 25 million Americans.”

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Photo source: Food Recovery Network

Ben Simon, the CEO of Imperfect and the founder of the Food Recovery Network, first realized how much food was wasted in his college’s cafeteria. “At 9 p.m. just before closing, there would be stations full of food,” Simon said.

Simon asked a friend who worked in the dining hall what happened to all of that food. He found out it was just thrown away. This sparked the Food Recovery Network. The Food Recovery Network “is the largest student movement against hunger and food waste,” Simon said.

It wasn’t until Simon got a segment on the Melissa Perry Harris show that the Food Recovery Network took off. “That day and week we got applications from college students to spread the program to other campuses,” Simon said. “Starting this program locally with friends and growing it to a larger size is one of the greatest experience I’ve ever had.”

Simon said that is the government’s goal to reduce food waste by 50% before 2030. About 40% of food is wasted per year which is about 197 million pounds of produce. Simon said most of this food is wasted on farms because they are too ugly.

“Cauliflower that has a slight yellowing to it from the sun aren’t even considered for market. Heaven forbid the sun shines on produce and gives it a little sun tan,” Simon joked. “Let’s sell some ugly produce and love imperfections.”

Simon’s company Imperfect has about 15,000 to 16,000 subscribers in CA where they originated. The subscribers receive a box of ugly produce to their doorstep.

Simon was a government and politician major in college. He encouraged students to get involved with different student organizations. “I’m doing something completely unrelated to my major because of different student organizations. I found myself through work outside of my major,” he said.

Freshman Erin November said “I found it interesting that he was a government student like myself but changed paths. It makes me think about what I can do to improve situations on campus dealing with food waste and environmental studies.”

Freshman Katie Garrett said “it was very inspiring that he could start his own company at such a young age and be so successful.” Simon said fighting food waste can help with hunger problems. “One in six Americans struggle with food insecurities,” he said.

Garrett said she found the statistics shocking. “We could easily fix our hunger problem if we weren’t concerned with a standard of how things should look in advertising,” she said.

Edited by: Brea Childs

The Answer to Everything

Celestia Randolph, Staff Writer

Duke University professor Michael Munger spoke to Wingate students about the likeliness of a near future wherein people enjoyed a “Sharing” and “Middle-Man” economy. The answer to his every question at the Tomorrow 3.0 lecture last Thursday evening was “transactions cost”. 

A middleman economy, Munger explained, is “a system in which entrepreneurs sold reductions in transaction cost”. An example of such an exchange might be a situation in which a person, intending to

transfer an item to a buyer, is deterred by the cost of shipping, packaging, etc., but with the presence of a middleman to reduce the cost of the transfer, the exchange is and profitable for all three people involved.

The second marketing style, a sharing economy, involves selling “access to a product or service desired by consumers to an excess capacity.” Our generation is already familiar with this concept. Munger explained that business such as Uber are introducing this concept to Europeans and now, to American millennials.

Such businesses maximize the public’s access to reusable services, lessening the need for individual modes of the same thing. This allows groups of consumers desiring the same service to rent or enjoy temporary access to what they need. Rather than spend money on storage for items or things they do not constantly require, people will profit from sharing or renting the same product to others. 

However, people of the current and previous generations are not as keen on embracing such ideas. Why? In any transference system, there are three pivotal factors to consider, Munger explained. Triangulation, transfer, and honesty. 

Triangulation refers to the terms of consumer and provider identity, location and price conditions community. The means of transfer and the honesty of both parties are also crucial to any sales or exchange. Therefore, a system involving constant dealings with strangers seems a bit overwhelming.

In such a communal society, the ideal mode of transferring goods would be exchange. Giving or simply selling products leaves one party with less than the other, but an exchange mutually benefits both parties. 

In that way there is no change in the total wealth of either trading partner and each gets what he prefers out of the deal. In such a unified society, it is clear that although there may be some drastic changes, people will become much more conscious of each other, as well as the importance of interpersonal communications and adapting to cultural progressivism.

Photo courtesy of econ.duke.edu

Edited by: Brea Childs

 

‘Enrique’s Journey’ author speaks on immigration issues

Courtney Bailey – Staff Writer

nazarioWelcoming refugees, reforming foreign policy, and extending a helping hand to those in need are only the beginning of award-winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario’s ideas for solving the hardships and horrors of immigration to the United States. On the evening of Oct. 27, the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Enrique’s Journey spoke to an audience of nearly 500 students about the migration struggles of a young boy from Honduras and thousands like him. From violent beatings to gang rape, Nazario made the audience explicitly aware of the overwhelming difficulties immigrants face trying to cross the border.

Wingate University’s Austin Auditorium was alive with excitement and anticipation, hushing to an attentive silence as Nazario took the stage. Though she was of average height, the stature of Nazario’s character, and passion for the topics on which she spoke commanded the room, instantly drawing the attention of both students and other locals in the community.

“It’s an important issue,” Nazario began as she introduced the topic of her speech. “And a local issue. It’s a story of migrating to North Carolina.”

Nazario recounted the highlights of Enrique’s Journey to the audience, sharing how this 11 year-old boy traveled all the way from Honduras to Cary, North Carolina, to find his mother while riding freight trains, enduring beatings, and battling a drug addiction. Enrique is but one example of thousands like him who face such horrific circumstances in their home country that they are willing to make the dangerous journey to the United States, only to be inflicted with yet another trauma: the U.S. judicial system.

Nazario told how living in Argentina during the “Dirty War” in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s shaped her into the advocate she is today. After she saw two journalists killed in the streets of Buenos Aires for trying to tell the truth about the war, Nazario decided she, too, wanted to be a journalist and make the world aware of the tragedies happening in Central America.

“I saw the power of words that day—the power of storytelling,” Nazario said. “I wanted to be a truth-teller. I want to grab my readers by the throat and take them for a ride through worlds they might not have otherwise known.”

Nazario continues to place herself in the shoes of these immigrants to better tell their stories, urged the audience to do “the right thing” and look at America’s immigration issue not as a political issue, but rather as a humanity issue.

“I hope everyone will join me in being a voice for refugee children,” Nazario said as she came to a close. “Increase foreign aid. Lobby to increase the number of refugees we take in. I know that if we push with the determination I saw on top of that train, we can slowly, surely change things in Central America.This is a true test for our great country. Are we going to rise to the level of humanity that is required of us?”

Several audience members gave Nazario a standing ovation at the end of her speech as loud applause filled the auditorium, showcasing the poignant impact and inspiration Nazario had evoked in the crowd.

“Overall, the Lyceum was amazing,” freshman student Aji Njie said. “We were all amazed by the things she had to endure, and everyone was touched, honestly. My biggest take-away is not to take things for granted.”

Edited by Brooke Griffin