Category Archives: Lyceum

Lyceum on sexual assault among college athletes leaves students confused

Gabby Cabrera, Staff Writer

In a lecture lyceum titled, Above the law: Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence in College Athletics, students were briefed about the prevalence of sexual assault in college athletics but many were left confused and disappointed, prompting university leaders to consider the need for more education.

“I thought it was confusing. All three seemed to have different opinions but tried to find a consensus,” said sophomore Marisa Ostoja about the Lyceum. “What I thought would be about sexual assault in sports, turned into a lesson about law.”

Students of Wingate University were left with more questions than answers as the panel, Athletics Director for Internal Operations  Dr. Renae Myles from Winthrop University, Director of Compliance Hank Harrawood from UNC-Charlotte and Coordinator of Sexual Trauma of Safe Alliance Dr. Norman Spencer, debated the issues surrounding sexual assault in college athletics. The organization Safe Alliance works with victims of domestic abuse and is based in Charlotte.

Dr. Dawn Norwood, the Director of Graudate Programs in the School of Sports Sciences at Wingate, said the panel discussion was originally established for the students of the master’s program but decided to open it up to all students by making it a Lyceum. However after the event, she said she is disappointed to know that many of the students were unaware of Title IX from the start.

“As a result of the panel discussion, I do see the need for all student body to be educated on Title IX by faculty and staff,” said Norwood.  “It’s our responsibility to make sure that students are informed and know where to go.”

During the event, Myles asked the audience if they knew where to go or what to do in case of an assault. A few students hesitantly replied, but none were sure.

Myles said it is important for students to know where and what resources are available in case an assault happens.

“You have somewhere to go,” said Myles. “Know where you should go.”

The panelists offered suggestions such as campus safety and contacting Title IX coordinator, Patrick Biggerstaff.

Norwood began the presentation with two videos. Both were network coverages of two sexual assault cases, one at Baylor University, and the other involving Brock Turner, a swimmer at Stanford University.

The Baylor case involves prosecutors claiming multiple former football players sexually assaulted women. A federal lawsuit claims university officials failed to respond sufficiently to the accusations.

The Brock Turner case convicted the former swimmer of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman. The lawsuit drew national attention after the victim’s impact statement went viral and the judge sentenced Turner to only six months in jail.

Norwood used the videos as an example to highlight the important issue of sexual assault and domestic violence on college campuses. She said as many as one in five women and one in 16 men become victims of sexual assault while in college.

For many students at the Lyceum, those statistics combined with the high-profile examples were a riveting combination.

“Dr. Norwood’s opening had me hooked,” said junior Shelby Dworek. “The videos and introduction statement were perfect. That’s why I was so disappointed in the rest of the program.”

Dr. Norwood asked the panel numerous questions about defining the term “lack of consent” and acknowledging available resources for victims. The panel also discussed the removal of the 2011 Title IX “Dear Colleague” letter which added extra protection to victim complaints and stripped nearly all protection from the accused.

Dworek said that while Dr. Norwood’s questions were clear and concise, the panelists’ answers were muddled and confusing.

“They kept referring to Title XI and the “Dear Colleague” letter, but I didn’t even know what that was!” said Dworek. “I felt a huge disconnection between myself and the panel.”

That disconnection came from the debate taking a legal turn, which Norwood said is not surprising since sexual assault is a very legal matter.

Norwood referred to the panelists as “passionate about their topic” and “answering from a position of expertise” when asked about the disunion between panel and student body.

“Perhaps the panel were so enthralled with the questions and topic that they began to speak as though with associates as opposed to bringing it down to meet the students’ needs,” said Norwood.

One student said she found the discussion, though a bit confusing, very informative.

“It is important to realize that sexual assault should not be tolerated,” said junior Sydney Homan. “I think the panel had a lot of knowledge and insight on sexual assault cases so it was interesting to hear stories from their perspective.”

Homan said sexual assault is something all college students should be knowledgeable about so that they will have the courage to bring cases forward.  

The discussion panel ended by recommending Safe Alliance to those who were interested in more information about sexual assault and domestic violence.

Edited by: Brea Childs

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Lyceum Requirement Changes Cause Confusion, Relief for Many Students

Savanna Harris, Staff Writer

When the word “Lyceum” is mentioned around the Wingate University campus, one would immediately think of a program put into place to enrich students and to broaden their educational experience. It offers students the opportunity to attend for lectures, performances, etc. that they might otherwise not be able to attend.

Even though Lyceums are a graduation requirement, they are not viewed as a burden. In fact, the majority of students get excited when an interesting Lyceum is announced.

Until this year, students were required to attend 40 Lyceums in order to complete the conditions for graduation. At the start of the 2017 school year, however, the requirement was dropped to 24.

Incoming freshmen shared an overall feeling of reprieve in learning this new information, seeing that it made college seem a little less overwhelming. Upperclassmen on the other hand, met the change with a different reaction.

Since they came to Wingate under the 40 Lyceum requirement, it wasn’t clear if the change applied to them too. Dr. Christy Carter, Associate Professor of Biology and Chair of the Lyceum Committee, was able to offer some insight.

As it turns out, the change in the number of required Lyceums applies to EVERYONE, including upperclassman who were enrolled under the original requirement.

The main cause for the change was an overall accommodation issue. With the incoming freshmen class, along with the whole student body, increasing every year, there simply wasn’t enough large areas to seat and host the events in.

Another large factor, Dr. Carter said, was intentionality, and wanting the Lyceum experience to be meaningful and enjoyable rather than oppressive. Commuter and nontraditional students and their unique situations were taken into consideration, as well. “We want students to chose Lyceums they feel they’ll actually get something out of instead of just checking off boxes for a graduation requirement.”

The change was made under the impression that students will be able to get the same benefits from going to 24 Lyceums as they could from going to 40. And thankfully, the changes seem to be a success. “So far, all of the feedback I’ve gotten from students has been good. Some faculty didn’t want the change, but there were enough who did want it for it to happen.”

For now, however, this is the only major change that is being made to the program anytime soon. The categories will remain the same, as well as attendance policies. If any other changes are made soon, they will be mainly for refinement purposes. “I think the Lyceum program should be reevaluated regularly and adapted to current situations on campus,” Dr. Carter said, “so the program will be as beneficial as possible to all who are involved.”

Edited by: Brea Childs

Lyceum preps students for successful interviews

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Going into an interview is all about having a great pair of shoes according to a panel of experts, with 130 years of combined knowledge, who hosted a Lyceum at Wingate University on Monday night.

“You can ruin a good business outfit with shoes that aren’t appropriate,” said panel member Steve Poston, the vice president and athletic director of Wingate University. “If you look like you have been out in the field plowing in the shoes you wear, it will ruin the outfit.”

Poston was one of the five-panel members to in the Lyceum discussion that allowed attending students a glimpse of why what you wear matters when it comes to getting a job. Each individual agreed that it takes only three things to make a good first impression: a nice suit for men, a professional blazer for women and a great pair of shoes are all it takes to make a good first impression.

“Somebody once told me to remember to interview for the job you want, not the job you have,” said Poston.

“It is very important to set yourself apart when making your first impression,” said Lynette Kennedy, a retail business woman for over 20 years. Tahira Stalberte, the assistant superintendent for Union County Public Schools, added onto Kennedy’s statement.

“Even though standing apart is important, make sure you yourself are not a distraction from the interview.”

All five experts agreed a candidate’s interview attire profoundly impacts the employer’s assessment of his qualifications. Kennedy said the employer may even judge a candidate’s character on what he looks like when he walks through the door to an interview.

“They really put an emphasis on first impressions,” Said Sierra Street, a sophomore at Wingate University. “It is very important to remain clean-cut and professional while still standing out enough to make that first impression last.”

Edited by Andrew Elliott and Malik Bledsoe

 

 

Dreamers of Wingate share their stories 

Savanna Harris, Staff Writer

DACA has been a hot news topic in recent weeks since the Trump Administration announced that the policy will be allowed to expire. But, what exactly is DACA?

Simply put, DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is a program that was put into place by President Barack Obama in 2012 to protect children of undocumented immigrants from deportation.

It also allows them to acquire important documents, such as work permits and driver’s licenses. Not only that, DACA is the reason that many of these children, who have been dubbed “dreamers,” are able to attend college. This includes students right here at Wingate, who are currently faced with possibly having to return to their birth countries in the midst of obtaining a  college education.

Affected students on campus knew that more people needed to be made aware of what is happening to them and many others, so the Latino Club sponsored a Lyceum last Wednesday, appropriately named, “Dreamers of Wingate.” The event also was supported by the Modern Languages and History and Political Science departments.

At the event, political science faculty member Dr. Steven Hyland, who was the host; the pastor of a local church; an immigration lawyer; and three of our DACA students all came together to tell their stories.

Father Benjamin Roberts, pastor at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Monroe, began by giving an emotional perspective. He said, “We want to maintain a vision of people, not numbers,” in reference to many viewpoints on immigration being based on the number of people who come here instead of why they come here. His speech paved the way for the informational portion of the program.

Following Father Roberts, Cynthia Aziz, an immigration lawyer who works out of Charlotte, provided details about the specific conditions and requirements of DACA, and gave insight into how it is being handled in Washington D.C. “DACA has become a political football, and it shouldn’t have. It was meant to be a humanitarian act,” she said.

She also went on to say that she has clients from places all over the world, such as Canada and even Lebanon, contrary to the stereotype that most or all of DACA recipients come from Central America or Mexico. The audience listened with great interest, but when the students began to recount their own personal experiences, all eyes were on them.

Alicia Rubio Gomez, sophomore, was the first of the students to speak. She described in great detail how it constantly feels as though she is up against a great opposition. “Regardless of the support, the thing that hangs in the backs of our minds are those who hate us,” said Alicia, whose parents brought her to this country from Mexico and settled in Lawrenceville, Ga.

Despite her struggles, the main one being unable to apply for colleges in Georgia, Gomez was able to come here thanks to a full scholarship designed specifically for DACA students.

Cristo Carrasco, from Charlotte, shared a similar experience, and said it has pushed him to do better. “DACA has personally influenced me to work harder, because I have been forced to carry the weight of being a ‘dreamer’ on my shoulders,” he said.

Maria Perez, freshman from Gainesville, Ga., closed out the Lyceum with the heartbreaking story of her father being deported, and went on to say that ultimately, she was not discouraged even through the heartbreak. “We will fight for a permanent solution,” she said.

Dr. Hyland said that recent polls indicate that a great majority of Americans support the right for undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children to become legal residents.

He said  he was pleased with the turnout of about 320 people for the event, which included students, faculty, staff and community members.“I think it was an important display of interest in DACA and its impact on Wingate and of solidarity on the part of our students for their fellow classmates and peers,” he said.

Edited by: Brea Childs

Library holds program on plagiarism for Academic Integrity Week

Dustin Kiggins, Staff Writer

In recognition of Academic Integrity Week on Wednesday, librarians from Ethel K. Library presented students with tips on how to avoid plagiarism when doing research and writing papers for class and future careers.

The presenters showed examples to students on plagiarism in music to see if the students understood the difference between what was and wasn’t plagiarized. This was so they had an idea of what to look for when presented with a written work.

“Music is different because there are only a few beat patterns that are used a lot,” said Amee Odem, a Wingate librarian. “If you are doing a parody of a song that is fine but if you want to use someone else’s song in part or entirely you must ask for permission first and pay royalties.”

The ability to properly cite other works when writing is important because it gives proper credit to the author of the original work.

“You need to treat citations as a conversation that you’re having with others,” said Kevin Winchester, director of the writing center. “When you cite works and then write your own you are joining the conversation and then contributing to it by writing your own  that will one day be cited as a source in another work.”

With citations you can also trace back the history of cited works and find things that you may have never seen before.

“Citation chaining is a neat trick where you can jump from one work to the next just by following their works cited sources,” Winchester said. “I’ve spent hours just going through other works to see all of the other works that someone else already cited.”

In order to emphasize the importance of citing, the presenters told several stories about people who didn’t properly cite their works and it ended their career. Odom told the story of Joseph Netti and Anil Potti who fabricated research data collected during their cancer study.

“The cancer society had funded their project at Duke University and they were fabricating data,” Odom said. “They were conducting studies with data that wasn’t properly verified and cited which was a problem since they were conducting studies on patients.”

This led to Duke University and the researchers to lose all scientific credibility that they once had. “Use this as an example as to what can happen if you don’t use proper citation methods.” Winchester chimed in.

The presenters advised students that changing one word in a portion of a work or using outside sources need to be cited.

“If you use anything from another work that is a direct quote, summary or paraphrase you need to cite it,” Winchester said. “There needs to be a path of search results showing you cited your work properly. The best thing to do is to keep a running citation of all the works you used in a paper,” Winchester said, “along with a bibliography of all the sources that you may have considered to ensure you aren’t plagiarizing.”
A representative of the honor council noted that when it comes to plagiarism, ignorance isn’t bliss.

Photo Source: Al Young

Edited by: Brea Childs

Wingate University Celebrates Women’s History Month with debut of Maya Angelou documentary

Nick Anta, Staff Writer

Wingate University kicked off Women’s History month Tuesday by screening Maya Angelou’s documentary, “And Still I Rise” with a discussion lead by producer/co-director Rita Coburn Whack.

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Photo source: Rogerebert.com

The film, which took over 6 years to make, showed a very intimate side of the singer, dancer, author, producer, playwright, poet and civil rights activist.

Mrs. Whack admitted that she felt “drawn to Maya” at a very young age. “I remember reading this book of poetry with a black woman on the back. I remember because it was the first time I’d ever seen a black author on the back of a book, let alone a woman” said Mrs. Whack.

She had begun sending candles and letters to Angelou’s representatives around that time in an attempt to show her how much of an impact she had. “As cheesy as it sounds, I’d go pick out these little candles and write her letters talking about how much she influenced me and my little lines of poetry along with them” said Mrs. Whack.

Years later, she would get her chance to finally interview Maya Angelou, while working for the Oprah Winfrey show. She wouldn’t know it at the time, but that was the start of a relationship that would ultimately allow her to complete the documentary, years later.

“That interview, along with a few other times that we met, showed Maya that she could trust me. That I wasn’t out to make a buck” said Mrs. Whack. The documentary proved the trust, as Maya gave details about past marriages, the feelings she had on her son’s possible paralysis, the assassination of MLK and many other sensitive topics.

Ultimately, the lyceum event left many students with feelings of admiration for the accomplishments of Maya, a woman of color in the civil rights era. “It was really powerful to see how she could accomplish all of that after being abandoned by her real family and sent away” said Zarron Harvey, a Senior at Wingate University.

“I think she’s a great example of just how much a woman can accomplish if she fights through what life throws at her” said Katie Bludau, a Junior at Wingate University.

The documentary will be airing on PBC intermittently throughout the month of March and will be available for purchase soon.  

Edited By: Brea Childs

Food Recovery Network founder sheds light on Food Waste and Ugly Produce

Sydney Walker, Staff Writer

Wingate, N.C. – “Food waste is not one problem, but a collection of hundreds of problems that need to be solved–especially if the growing population wants to be fed,” said Ben Simon to Wingate University students. “The only way to feed the estimated 9 billion people in 2050 is to reduce the amount of food waste. Reducing just 15% of food waste could feed 25 million Americans.”

Ben+Simon+Headshot+Nov2013
Photo source: Food Recovery Network

Ben Simon, the CEO of Imperfect and the founder of the Food Recovery Network, first realized how much food was wasted in his college’s cafeteria. “At 9 p.m. just before closing, there would be stations full of food,” Simon said.

Simon asked a friend who worked in the dining hall what happened to all of that food. He found out it was just thrown away. This sparked the Food Recovery Network. The Food Recovery Network “is the largest student movement against hunger and food waste,” Simon said.

It wasn’t until Simon got a segment on the Melissa Perry Harris show that the Food Recovery Network took off. “That day and week we got applications from college students to spread the program to other campuses,” Simon said. “Starting this program locally with friends and growing it to a larger size is one of the greatest experience I’ve ever had.”

Simon said that is the government’s goal to reduce food waste by 50% before 2030. About 40% of food is wasted per year which is about 197 million pounds of produce. Simon said most of this food is wasted on farms because they are too ugly.

“Cauliflower that has a slight yellowing to it from the sun aren’t even considered for market. Heaven forbid the sun shines on produce and gives it a little sun tan,” Simon joked. “Let’s sell some ugly produce and love imperfections.”

Simon’s company Imperfect has about 15,000 to 16,000 subscribers in CA where they originated. The subscribers receive a box of ugly produce to their doorstep.

Simon was a government and politician major in college. He encouraged students to get involved with different student organizations. “I’m doing something completely unrelated to my major because of different student organizations. I found myself through work outside of my major,” he said.

Freshman Erin November said “I found it interesting that he was a government student like myself but changed paths. It makes me think about what I can do to improve situations on campus dealing with food waste and environmental studies.”

Freshman Katie Garrett said “it was very inspiring that he could start his own company at such a young age and be so successful.” Simon said fighting food waste can help with hunger problems. “One in six Americans struggle with food insecurities,” he said.

Garrett said she found the statistics shocking. “We could easily fix our hunger problem if we weren’t concerned with a standard of how things should look in advertising,” she said.

Edited by: Brea Childs