Category Archives: NEWS

BIGG talks E-Waste

Celestia Randolph, Staff Writer

Southern Environmental Solutions of the Carolinas (SESC) is a family owned business dedicated to servicing local landfills established on government contracts. The objective of SESC is to collect recyclable electronic waste, or,  e-waste, promote organizational interactivity.

By setting high standards and collaborating and partnerships, site visits, SESC teaches individuals as well as corporations, schools, churches, and other social organizations the “four r’s”.

The four r’s are re-use, refurbish, recycle and respect which are central to recycling effectively.

Mrs. Lynda Kuehni, Director of Sales and Marketing of the SESC spoke to members of Bulldogs Into Going Green (BIGG) last Monday. She spoke on her organization’s mission to educate Carolinians on the responsible disposal of digital waste.

Kuehni also worked with BIGG to ponder ways for Wingate students to promote the safe distribution electronic devices.

Before diving directly into electronic waste management, Mrs. Kuehni broke the ice by discussing ways they already take initiative to educate others to treat their environment with greater respect and develop new habits of recycling, cutting down on energy usage, and other low-effort, green practices which eventually add up to a significant difference. Everyone managed to speak, and before long there were eco-warrior stories of inspiration ranging from sea turtle sympathies to influencing roommates or teammates.

What makes the SESC so important is that it spares the environment from the devastating effects of chemicals still trapped in damaged or aged electronics.  What the term “e-waste” refers to is anything containing wire, anything which plugs into an outlet, or battery supported items such as TVs, VCR, DVD players, stereos, appliances, copiers, etc.

The metals in these electronics such as aluminum, steel, iron and lead, which harm the environment, can easily be reused. Precious metals, such as copper and gold, can also be drawn from the inside of laptops, cell phones, and even automobile parts.

Currently, the number of cell phones coming into existence exceeds the human population by two million. When those are disposed of, the metals in the chips and intricate wirings inside them will either be collected and reused by facilities such as SESC or will end up releasing chemicals into a dump somewhere corroding precious, expensive metals.

Another factor of digital responsibility is erasing the data stored on these devices. Computers and communication technology have personal data stored on them, which, without proper removal, can be released or obtained by less than savory operations.

The SESC instructs universities, schools and other businesses requiring personal information from students and employees how to protect data stored on sim cards, and offers a way to safely destroy the data before disposing of the device. The hard drive shredding method used by the organization wipes data electronically and is Department of Defence certified.

If items cannot be either salvaged or repaired, it’s still important to recycle it because along with the aforementioned metals, lead and harmful chemicals can seep into the Earth.

The steps students realized they were making may have been impactful, but the students were still eager to learn more bringing them together in a conference with a representative of a local eco-system solutions institution. Now eager to learn more about this opportunity to once again spread green awareness, students were ready to learn more about the organization the speaker who caused them to reflect on their successes represented.

Edited By Andrew Elliott and Rachael Robinson

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Veteran Shares Difficult Training Regimen For 31 Marathons

Photo by Gabriela Cabrera

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Rob Jones, an amputee veteran, ran his 29th marathon on Thursday, November 9, in his mission to complete 31 marathons in 31 days.  Residents of Charlotte showed up at 6 a.m. to show their support and run alongside him.

Jones plans to set an example for other veterans who have gone through similar trials.  Also, Jones hopes to have an impact on those who have not experienced such a life-altering event.

“Instead of seeing tragedy or hardship as something that is blocking your path or getting in your way, seeing it as an opportunity to get stronger…seeing it as something that can make you better,” said Jones.

Jones consistently ran and trained his body for 18 months prior to beginning the marathons, said Pam Jones, the wife of Rob Jones. During training, Jones ran two hours every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday.  On Friday he ran one and each Thursday, he ran a full marathon. Sunday was his only day off.

Jones’ wife said the physical fitness came quickly for him. She said he had always been a natural athlete.  The biggest concern was conditioning his joints in preparation for a month of marathons.

Rob Jones was completely self-coached.  Pam Jones commented on how determined he was and how his childhood led him to be a disciplined individual.  

Growing up, Rob Jones was an athlete and had coaches who pushed him to be the best he could be.  The military also forced Jones to be disciplined and ready for anything.  As a result, Jones knew what his body needed in order to complete this challenge.  

Jones took it upon himself to research and learn as much as he could about nutritional benefits. Pam Jones said he is always looking for a way to improve himself physically and mentally.  

“He is just one of those people that wants to be a better person every day, and that could be by making himself physically better or making himself mentally better,” said Pam Jones.  “He has been researching and reading books.  He is constantly trying to expand his knowledge about something.”

Jones’ diet was also a crucial part to excelling in his performance.  Jones’ wife pre-made all food before the trip to freeze while they were traveling.  This limited the cooking time and supplies they would have to carry with them.

“Rob eats the same food every single day so that he has the right breakdown of calories.  He has the exact same meal prepared the exact same way every single day.  Which for you and me, would seem very monotonous, but that is what he needs to do in order to get the right calories from the right place,” said Pam Jones.

Jones was held to a strict high-fat diet, which helped with reducing inflammation in his joints and abrasions on his legs.  

During the process of running every day, Rob Jones kept his heart rate below 150 beats per minute in order to reduce the tissue breakdown.  Jones set a personal record while running his 10th marathon in Chicago, Illinois.

Pam Jones said the recovery process is just as important as the preparation process. She made sure that all Jones had to do was focus on running, sleeping, eating and talking to any media who came through.  She focused on driving the RV, cooking the food, and keeping him up to date on who he would be talking to at each location.

Carol Miller, Jones’ mother and a professional massage therapist, also helped Jones by giving him hour-long massages twice a day to help with the soreness and performance.

Edited by Gabriela Cabrera and Mason Teague

‘Class Cab’ Kicks Off Homecoming With a New Ride

Allison Hoyle, Staff Writer

Putting a spin on the hit TV show, Cash Cab, BARC put together an event this past Monday dubbed “Class Cab” to help kick off Wingate’s Homecoming week. The campus could be seen with several golf carts which were decked out in blue and gold decoration zooming around and passengers blurting out answers to the driver of the cart.

Passengers ranged from just one to a full cart .  Students were able to catch a ride on the golf carts and could answer Wingate related questions to win prizes while they were shuttled to their next class.

While students who were on teams competed for the Homecoming Cup, other students were able to participate and could win spirit items such as pom-poms, Wingate cups, koozies and several other goodies.

“As I was walking to the McGee Center, someone pulled up beside me on a Wingate decorated golf cart and asked if I needed a ride to my destination, I said sure and the next thing I knew I was being cheered on by the driver and another member of BARC as they asked me questions,” said Class Cab participate, Lizzie Gamwell. “Whenever I got a question right, they kept cheering me on and I ended up winning some gold beads and a koozie.”

Students were asked questions that ranged anywhere between traditional Wingate history and the knowledge of locations of different things on campus.

“I loved being able to ride from class to my apartment instead of having to walk, plus I won a free cup in the end and was also able to help my team win some points that went towards the Homecoming Cup,” said Kaley Geer. “I was kind of nervous about it at first because I wasn’t really sure what all I would be asked, but once I got started I realized that I actually knew a lot more about Wingate than I originally thought!

With other homecoming activities going on throughout the week, it was important to get students in the spirit by starting with something as interactive as Cash Cart.

“We had a great turn out with participants doing the Class Cab and I really enjoyed being a part of it with asking questions to students because it really showed how much students actually pay attention to their surroundings on campus,” said Mariah Teague, BARC spirit chair.

“I really believe that by BARC putting on this event, it put students in the mood for homecoming and that’s really what it’s all about. Seeing everyone so excited makes us excited and lets us know that we’re doing a great job at putting on these events,” Teague continued

Edited by: Andrew Elliott and Rachael Robinson

WU Students TP Campus for Homecoming Celebration

toiletpaper

Wessli-Ann Hardee, Staff Writer

Wingate University students clear out the store shelves as they stock up on toilet paper for the annual homecoming tradition of “TPing” the campus on Thursday night.

For years, Wingate University has been establishing traditions for students to take part in during homecoming. One of their biggest is allowing the students to cover the campus in toilet paper.

Bailey Goforth, a sophomore at Wingate, said she had heard about the crazy tradition when she toured the campus as a senior in high school.

“I never believed it could be as fun as they said it was, but participating in it as a freshman made me realize that what they were saying was true,” Goforth said. “It’s one of my favorite memories as a student here and something I always look forward to.”

“TPing” is usually seen as a type of vandalism, but the staff at Wingate University allow the students to have a little fun doing something they normally couldn’t get away with.

“I almost feel bad for making our campus look so terrible, but it really does look so cool the next day when you are walking to class,” Goforth said.

On the Thursday night of homecoming week, students leave their rooms and cover every inch of campus with toilet paper. They even go as far as pouring soap in the fountains.

“Last year I jumped in the fountain full of soap, even though it was freezing outside,” said student Veronica Manka. “I plan on doing that again this year. It was so fun.”

Wingate’s Student Government Association also created a little incentive for students in order to make the clean up the following week a little bit easier. For each garbage bag of toilet paper the students bring to the Office of Residence Life, they will receive a free t-shirt.

“Although it’s a lot of fun throwing the toilet paper…it makes quite the mess. To try and help maintenance, SGA encourages students to join in our annual clean up the Monday following homecoming,” said Kirby VonEgidy, vice president of marketing and communications for Wingate University’s student government. “We made the mess, the least we can do is help pick it up.”

The tradition has become such a fun event for the students to participate in, and senior Zack Singleton said it will be on his list of “most missed things” about Wingate University when he graduates in the spring.

“I’ve always looked forward to ‘TPing’ the quad,” said Singleton. “I’m really bummed that this will be my last year.”

Wingate’s homecoming week was full of games, activities and events. “TPing” the quad is one of the final traditions before the homecoming tailgate and football game on Nov. 4.

Edited by Gabriela Cabrera, Ryan Mackintosh and Mason Teague

Former Disney Executive Creates NaviGATEtours Magic

Sydney Taylor, Staff Writer

A former Disney executive spoke to Wingate University’s tour guides about effective customer service and the best practices for interacting with the public on Wednesday John Formica is the former manager of the Walt Disney World Resort.  He worked at Disney for over 20 years, learning the ins and outs of the company and what made it the success it is today.  

In his meeting with the tour guides, also called NaviGATEtours, Formica described Disney’s business model and how it can be applied at Wingate. He explained how to make the experience “magical”.  Formica likened doing a job to being “on-stage”.

“I wasn’t exactly sure what Mr. Formica was going to talk to us about”, said NaviGATEtour, Maddie Pope. “I wasn’t sure how Disney World and Wingate related to each other”.

Formica called Wingate University a business and said it is necessary for the tour guides to think of it as such. When people visit they are deciding whether or not they are going to write a check and invest in the school.

“When people stop writing checks you’re all out of business”, said Formica “You’ll just be an average university”.

Formica explained tour guides play a role and are on all of the time, every day of the year.

Disney is known for several things including having nice people, being clean, paying attention to detail, and exceeding expectations. Formica said that this is the reputation Wingate should be striving for as well.

At Wingate, there are several things that tour guides can do to ensure that prospective students have an experience that will make them want to attend.

NaviGATEtour, Tim Myers, agrees with Formica, “We are in the business of making sure that people’s experience on our campus is the best experience that they can have on any campus.”

Formica said one way creating an experience can be done is by forming good with relationships with visiting students. In order to build a relationship, tour guides have to “be interested, not interesting” according to Formica. Be interested in the individual in order to connect with them. “Get to know their story”, said Formica. “If you do that, they’ll hear you and want to know your story as well.”

Formica also explained that, like Walt Disney, tour guides have to “create the dream”. In order to do that a question must be answered: What do you visualize this campus to be? It is important to know our purpose on campus. For tour guides, the purpose is to change lives. It is also imperative that you believe in your purpose.

Formica also described how there are three things that Disney sells: imagination, fantasy and happiness. Keeping with the Disney model, Formica explained that it’s the job of the tour guides to help visiting students imagine what it would be like to attend Wingate, build their fantasy and show how the school creates happiness.

Formica told NaviGATEtours that visiting students should be treated as guests. Guests want reliability, responsiveness and empathy, assurance and trust, tangibles, personal attention and a positive, memorable experience. Formica advised that appearance, dialogue and body language all create an impression that will be perceived by prospective students, their parents, and everyone else on campus.

Formica ended with the talk by urging the tour guides to enjoy what they do. He noted how Walt Disney believed that if you could dream it, you could believe it.

Edited By: Andrew Elliott and Rachael Robinson

WU Math Ed Majors attend NCCMT Conference

Laura Thompson, Staff Writer

Two Wingate University education majors are attending the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics for professional development experience.

Math professor, Dr. Laora Brizendine,  is taking two students, Matt Pugh and Shannon Moore, to the NCCMT conference. The conference is held annually in Greensboro and is sponsored by the NCCMT. It goes on for two days with sessions about technology in the classrooms.

“The reason that I want the students to go is because there are some sessions for first year teachers,” said Brizendine.

Brizendine said students will learn about some of the issues they may run into in their first, second and third year of teaching.

There are sessions for DESMOS tutorials, graphing calculators and college level math. Brizendine said these are going to be some of the most beneficial sessions for the attending students because it will allow the students to see technology in use.

Wingate students have been going to this conference for four years with Dr. Brizendine and Dr. Sandy Mills, although Mills will not be attending this year. This trip was made possible through a grant that Brizendine wrote and applied for through the Dean’s Office.

One student was surprised to hear that Wingate University offered the opportunity to attend math conferences.  

I am hoping to learn how to use LEGO bricks to teach math, how to connect math with literature and what new technology can help teach math.” said Middle Grades Education major, Matt Pugh.

There are sessions broken down by grade level, which will help guide the student attendees to the sessions that will best interest and benefit them. At the conference, there are also current practicing teachers that will present new ideas about what works best in the classroom.

There will also be several keynote speakers present at the conference,  such as Peg Smith and Jenny Bay Williams. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction will also present on their status and what they are doing.

Edited by Gabriela Cabrera, Ryan Mackintosh, and Mason Teague

Lyceum preps students for successful interviews

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Going into an interview is all about having a great pair of shoes according to a panel of experts, with 130 years of combined knowledge, who hosted a Lyceum at Wingate University on Monday night.

“You can ruin a good business outfit with shoes that aren’t appropriate,” said panel member Steve Poston, the vice president and athletic director of Wingate University. “If you look like you have been out in the field plowing in the shoes you wear, it will ruin the outfit.”

Poston was one of the five-panel members to in the Lyceum discussion that allowed attending students a glimpse of why what you wear matters when it comes to getting a job. Each individual agreed that it takes only three things to make a good first impression: a nice suit for men, a professional blazer for women and a great pair of shoes are all it takes to make a good first impression.

“Somebody once told me to remember to interview for the job you want, not the job you have,” said Poston.

“It is very important to set yourself apart when making your first impression,” said Lynette Kennedy, a retail business woman for over 20 years. Tahira Stalberte, the assistant superintendent for Union County Public Schools, added onto Kennedy’s statement.

“Even though standing apart is important, make sure you yourself are not a distraction from the interview.”

All five experts agreed a candidate’s interview attire profoundly impacts the employer’s assessment of his qualifications. Kennedy said the employer may even judge a candidate’s character on what he looks like when he walks through the door to an interview.

“They really put an emphasis on first impressions,” Said Sierra Street, a sophomore at Wingate University. “It is very important to remain clean-cut and professional while still standing out enough to make that first impression last.”

Edited by Andrew Elliott and Malik Bledsoe