Tag Archives: Interviews

Wingate Women’s Golf Recap

Philip Harris, Staff Writer

The Wingate University Women’s Golf team has been the model of consistency this season, earning their way to No. 11 in the Golf Stat NCAA Division II rankings. The team came in fourth in the Battle at Old South at UNC-Pembroke, their first tournament of the season; they finished with a score of 598.

The second tournament for the Bulldogs resulted in their best finish of the season when the team took first place in the Myrtle Beach Intercollegiate. The Bulldogs were able to win with 611 points, managing to fight off conference rivals Tusculum and Lenoir-Rhyne. Both of them were one stroke behind.

In the Flagler Fall Slam at Flagler University, the third tournament of the season, the Lady Bulldogs finished third with a score of 592. The team finished second in both the Newberry Invitational and the Barton Invitational; posting scores of 617 and 622, respectively. The Bulldogs finished in third in both the LMU Spring Invitational and the Low Country Invitational; putting up scores of 608 and 624 for both events.

Wingate has gotten solid contributions from sophomore Diana McDonald, who set a program record shooting four-under-par on the second day of the Battle at Old South Tournament. McDonald also earned medals and all-tournament honors in four of the teams tournaments.

The Bulldogs look to continue their consistent season when they compete in the Wingate Challenge at the Rolling Hills Country Club in Monroe, N.C. on March 19.


Edited by Brendan Shriver


Homicide across from campus causes schoolwide lockdown

Keyana Daye, Staff Writer

Wingate students started their Monday afternoon just like any other until the sound of a siren was played from the bell tower. A lockdown had begun. Earlier that morning the Union County law enforcement had responded to a report of a shooting on Jerome Street, which is across from Wingate University.

Once Campus Safety was notified, the University Crisis Management Team mobilized and the University initiated lockdown procedure. All students were notified to seek shelter to the closest building. The lockdown lasted an hour long until the University was advised by law enforcement to resume normal operations while law enforcement remained on campus. On Tuesday morning the suspect, Douglas Cleveland Colson, turned himself into custody of the Wingate police department.

The homicide that prompted a lockdown on Wingate campus happened shortly after 10am, Monday morning. The victim, Prentis Robinson, was live streaming on Facebook Live after leaving the Wingate Police Department from reporting cellular theft.

On his way back to his home, Douglas Colson appeared who he then exchanged a few words with. There are reports that Robinson had suspected Colson of drug dealing. Shortly afterwards shots were fired and a few minutes later he was pronounced dead on the scene. This all took place less than a mile away from Wingate University.

While the homicide took place approximately at 10 a.m., the lockdown on Wingate campus didn’t take place until a little after 11 a.m. Some students reported that they thought it was odd since they had been seeing helicopters in the sky over campus.

And there were some students, like Jessica Daniels, that had heard Wingate Elementary School was on lockdown around 11 a.m. When Daniels heard about this and saw helicopters outside, she decided to call Wingate Campus Safety to check on things.

She reported that a woman answered the phone but reacted as if it were the first time she had heard of there being an shooting. After a few minutes of being on hold, the woman said, “So, someone was shot in the area, but it’s not like there is a killer on the loose.”, and according to Jessica Daniels it was less than 10 minutes later that the lockdown was called for.

As soon as the siren was played, it would be expected that everyone who heard the siren would move into the nearest building and turn off all the lights. However, according to most students, nobody knew what to do or even knew what the siren meant.

Some students reported that people kept walking around as the siren played and that even 10 minutes into the lockdown some professors were still lecturing. And according to most students, the general census was that nobody knew that the lockdown had started until they received text alerts from Wingate Campus Safety. Also during the campus-wide lockdown, many students reported that they were in rooms that did not have locks.

Many students expressed concern and were confused as to why it took so long from the initial incident to initiate the lockdown. In response to these questions, Chief of Wingate Campus Safety, Michael Easley, stated that Wingate Campus Safety was currently in the process of testing new locks and that by the end of next week they should have more locks to test.

And in response to the confusion of the wait in between the incident and the lockdown he stated, “I was not made aware until approximately 11 a.m. by the Wingate police department. I, then assembled the Crisis Management team and we analyzed the situation and sent out the first request for a lockdown at 11:30.”

He also reported that the public was able to know about the incident before Campus Safety and the police because the victim was live streaming on Facebook. Once the incident was analyzed, the Crisis Management team and Wingate police department was able to initiate action.

In response to the incident, an email was sent out to students on Tuesday afternoon detailing that the suspect was in custody and summarized the lockdown procedure that took place that Monday afternoon.

The Crisis Management team and Campus Safety are assessing their response and are currently accepting feedback from students, faculty, and parents. A listening session for students was held with the SGA forum and individual training will be held for Wingate employees in response to the incident.

Edited by: Brea Childs

Photo credit: Flickr

Student Athlete Spotlight: Hannah Hinson

Mason Teague, Staff Writer

A ton of athletes across different sports tell about how they have always loved playing their sport ever since they were a little kid. In the case of junior women’s track & field student-athlete Hannah Hinson of Suffolk, Va., being a thrower began during her freshman year in high school.

At a football game her freshman year, Hinson was approached by a P.E. teacher, who encouraged her to come out for throwing on the school’s track & field team that spring.  She decided to take the chance and try out, which proved to be one of the best choices she ever made.

“I immediately fell in love with throwing when I started,” says Hinson.  “It felt really natural from the beginning and I knew that it was something that I wanted to get good at.”

Hinson threw discus and shotput all four years of high school at Kings Fork High, and decided her senior year to pursue her passion at the collegiate level at Wingate.  The transition from throwing in high school to college, however, was a lot more difficult than she anticipated.

“It was definitely a big change in terms of the different training styles between high school and college, as well as how much more the coaching staff at Wingate demands of you than high school coaches,” says Hinson.“But the coaches at Wingate have pushed me to be better every day since I’ve been here, which really helped me to get used to everything very quickly.”

Hinson throws hammer, discus and shotput for the outdoor and indoor Women’s Track & Field team, and has had a large amount of success in the two years she has participated.  She broke the school record for indoor hammer throw, also known as weight throw, at the JDL Fast Track Meet in 2016, as well as winning All-SAC honors for hammer throw (2016, 2017) and discus (2017).

As she continues to challenge herself each season, Hinson has created two personal goals for herself during her junior season.

“I want to be the first thrower in Wingate history to make Nationals for indoor this year,” says Hinson.  “I also want to win discus and hammer throw in the SAC for outdoor this year.”

As the new season begins, Hinson sees a lot of potential for her team as they compete against other schools in the SAC conference.

“We challenge each other every day by competing against one another to be the best at our sport out of the entire team,” Hinson says.“I believe that this healthy competition is going to help us when we compete against other throwers because we will already have that competitive edge that we give one another on the team.”


Edited by Brendan Shriver

Limited parking at Wingate has students feeling frustrated

Keyana Daye, Staff Writer

With the admission of over 1,000 freshman students last semester, which is almost double the size of all previous classes, there was bound to be some issues. One of the biggest issues to most students, and even faculty, would be parking.

No matter which parking lot you pull into, the game of luck always seems to be in full effect. With a grand total of 2,616 parking spaces on our campus it should be easy to find a convenient place to park but most students can’t even park in the lots outside of their own dorm. So, of course the issue of parking is very prominent to Wingate University students.

At the very beginning of the Fall 2017 semester, four overflow lots were added. Their locations are at the precarious gravel lot by the Cafeteria, on Camden Street near the intersection of Oak and Camden, and there are two lots on Faculty Drive.

However, most students are hesitant to park in those lots. Some stating the issue of tardiness because of the distance these lots are from their classes and or the issue of safety.

Some students, like Jaycie Haymore, work late at night and when it comes time to return to her dorms there are no open spaces in the lots closest to her residence hall. According to Officer Jane Horne, you have the option of calling Campus Safety for an escort if you park in one of the overflow lots that aren’t as close to your dorm or apartment building, in case you don’t feel safe.  

Jaycie Haymore recounts, “And even if I park in a far lot, like behind McGee, it’s scary to walk back to Beam. I’ve even had someone follow me and catcall me.”. If she had known about this information beforehand, or if there were more panic buttons around campus then her situation could have been avoided, she believes.

When students were asked where they often saw people getting ticketed, most of the popular locations were behind the Neu building and the cafeteria parking lot. To avoid these tickets, students should be aware of the designated permit required for the lot, park inside an actual space, and to not park in the grass ever.

There have been several occasions where residential lots are riddled with commuter cars parked in their spaces, and likewise. It is a frustration that is mutually shared amongst all students and faculty alike when this situation could be avoided with mutual respect and understanding by all.

Most students report that parking for the new spring semester has not improved. With that concern in mind it was important to address the rumor floating about that the next class of freshman would not be allowed to bring their cars to campus.

However, Officer Jane Horne reports, “As of today, the freshman will be able to bring their cars to campus. I do not know if it will change in the future.”. She also reports that the University has not yet decided to add any more parking lots next semester.
When presented with this information freshman commuter Kimberly Duong says, “I think that’s a bad move for everyone. Commuters already have it hard as it is, and having more cars and the same amount of spaces only calls for more issues.”. The issue of parking may never be fully solved but all further questions can be answered by Campus Safety.

Edited by: Brea Childs

Veteran Shares Difficult Training Regimen For 31 Marathons

Photo by Gabriela Cabrera

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Rob Jones, an amputee veteran, ran his 29th marathon on Thursday, November 9, in his mission to complete 31 marathons in 31 days.  Residents of Charlotte showed up at 6 a.m. to show their support and run alongside him.

Jones plans to set an example for other veterans who have gone through similar trials.  Also, Jones hopes to have an impact on those who have not experienced such a life-altering event.

“Instead of seeing tragedy or hardship as something that is blocking your path or getting in your way, seeing it as an opportunity to get stronger…seeing it as something that can make you better,” said Jones.

Jones consistently ran and trained his body for 18 months prior to beginning the marathons, said Pam Jones, the wife of Rob Jones. During training, Jones ran two hours every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday.  On Friday he ran one and each Thursday, he ran a full marathon. Sunday was his only day off.

Jones’ wife said the physical fitness came quickly for him. She said he had always been a natural athlete.  The biggest concern was conditioning his joints in preparation for a month of marathons.

Rob Jones was completely self-coached.  Pam Jones commented on how determined he was and how his childhood led him to be a disciplined individual.  

Growing up, Rob Jones was an athlete and had coaches who pushed him to be the best he could be.  The military also forced Jones to be disciplined and ready for anything.  As a result, Jones knew what his body needed in order to complete this challenge.  

Jones took it upon himself to research and learn as much as he could about nutritional benefits. Pam Jones said he is always looking for a way to improve himself physically and mentally.  

“He is just one of those people that wants to be a better person every day, and that could be by making himself physically better or making himself mentally better,” said Pam Jones.  “He has been researching and reading books.  He is constantly trying to expand his knowledge about something.”

Jones’ diet was also a crucial part to excelling in his performance.  Jones’ wife pre-made all food before the trip to freeze while they were traveling.  This limited the cooking time and supplies they would have to carry with them.

“Rob eats the same food every single day so that he has the right breakdown of calories.  He has the exact same meal prepared the exact same way every single day.  Which for you and me, would seem very monotonous, but that is what he needs to do in order to get the right calories from the right place,” said Pam Jones.

Jones was held to a strict high-fat diet, which helped with reducing inflammation in his joints and abrasions on his legs.  

During the process of running every day, Rob Jones kept his heart rate below 150 beats per minute in order to reduce the tissue breakdown.  Jones set a personal record while running his 10th marathon in Chicago, Illinois.

Pam Jones said the recovery process is just as important as the preparation process. She made sure that all Jones had to do was focus on running, sleeping, eating and talking to any media who came through.  She focused on driving the RV, cooking the food, and keeping him up to date on who he would be talking to at each location.

Carol Miller, Jones’ mother and a professional massage therapist, also helped Jones by giving him hour-long massages twice a day to help with the soreness and performance.

Edited by Gabriela Cabrera and Mason Teague

Lyceum preps students for successful interviews

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Going into an interview is all about having a great pair of shoes according to a panel of experts, with 130 years of combined knowledge, who hosted a Lyceum at Wingate University on Monday night.

“You can ruin a good business outfit with shoes that aren’t appropriate,” said panel member Steve Poston, the vice president and athletic director of Wingate University. “If you look like you have been out in the field plowing in the shoes you wear, it will ruin the outfit.”

Poston was one of the five-panel members to in the Lyceum discussion that allowed attending students a glimpse of why what you wear matters when it comes to getting a job. Each individual agreed that it takes only three things to make a good first impression: a nice suit for men, a professional blazer for women and a great pair of shoes are all it takes to make a good first impression.

“Somebody once told me to remember to interview for the job you want, not the job you have,” said Poston.

“It is very important to set yourself apart when making your first impression,” said Lynette Kennedy, a retail business woman for over 20 years. Tahira Stalberte, the assistant superintendent for Union County Public Schools, added onto Kennedy’s statement.

“Even though standing apart is important, make sure you yourself are not a distraction from the interview.”

All five experts agreed a candidate’s interview attire profoundly impacts the employer’s assessment of his qualifications. Kennedy said the employer may even judge a candidate’s character on what he looks like when he walks through the door to an interview.

“They really put an emphasis on first impressions,” Said Sierra Street, a sophomore at Wingate University. “It is very important to remain clean-cut and professional while still standing out enough to make that first impression last.”

Edited by Andrew Elliott and Malik Bledsoe



Wingate Leo Club host its first Induction Ceremony to commemorate new members

Leah Joyner, Staff Writer

The Wingate University Leo Club welcomed new members into their organization last Tuesday at a special Induction Ceremony hosted by the Wingate Lions Club at the Wingate Baptist Fellowship Hall. For the ceremony, the upcoming Leo Club Officers were installed, new t-shirts were distributed to members and everyone celebrated the 100th birthday of the Lions Club International .

Leo Club, which was formed on Wingate’s campus last year, is a service organization that focuses on spreading awareness to the community about visual impairment. Throughout the year they host several community service opportunities for members to get involved in, and that is exactly what the Wingate Lions are doing. .

“I think the Induction Ceremony went really well. The Lions Club did a nice job putting it on, and it made me feel like our club was really capable of making an impact in the community. I hope that the Leo Club continues to grow and that we are able to help more people in the community,” said Bailey Freeburn, WU Leo Club Treasurer. 

Photo Credit: Leah Joyner

At the start of the evening, Leo Club members were welcomed by Wingate Lions Club members with pizza and warm smiles. After some social time, Wingate Lions Club member Dale Dupree spoke about the Lions Club International and his involvement with the Wingate Lions Club branch.

Dupree is also the liaison between the two clubs. One of the things he shared was that  Leo Club stands for “Leadership, Experience, and Opportunity” as young adults strive to develop valuable leadership skills, make new friends, and have fun while offering humanitarian services to their community.

Dupree then asked the District Lions Club Cabinet Treasurer, Harvey Whitley to install the new Leo Club members and WU Club Officers. Gabrielle Slabaugh was inducted as President, Caroline Rumley as Vice President, Katlyn Nicholas as Secretary, Bailey Freeburn as Treasure, and Sydney Walker as the Public Relations Chairperson.

“The Induction Ceremony was significant because it marks the Wingate Centennial Omega Leo Club as an official registered and certified Leo Club. For the future, we look forward to serving the community through visual activities and recycling/clean-up projects.” said Gabrielle Slabaugh.

Known around campus as “The Bulldogs that Roar,” the Leos have been known to help pick up trash along the road, send letters to soldiers, and host the Blind Olympics, all to spread awareness about the visually impaired. This year they hope to expand by reaching out to the community and  helping the Wingate Lions Club with their programs.

“Leo Club has really helped me learn more about some issues facing people in the community. Before I joined Leo Club I didn’t realize how many people suffered from visual impairments in this area, and so I think this club has helped me become more aware,” said Freeburn.  

On Wingate University’s campus, Leo Club has meetings every other Tuesday night at 6:30pm and the next meeting will be on Tuesday, October 24 in Hayes 202. Their next community service event will be the Letters to Soldiers table on November 7 from around 5p.m.-8p.m. where students can come write letters to those in the military.  

If you are interested in joining the Leo Club, come to a meeting or contact Gabrielle Slabaugh at ga.slabaugh003@wingate.edu or Caroline Rumley at ca.rumley171@wingate.edu.

Edited by: Brea Childs