Tag Archives: Wingate University

Mental health problems facing college students all around

Aleah Cady, Staff Writer

College can be an exciting, enriching experience. For most young adults, college is their first step into the world of “adulthood”- that may mean living away from home, having a job, paying bills for the first time, and taking on the responsibilities of college-level courses.

College is a different experience for each student, but unfortunately for some, the fun parts of school such as making new friends, or having more freedom, are overshadowed by situations which can be stressful, and make school feel like a burden.

It can be pretty shocking to transition from four years of high school and living at home, and suddenly adapt to a faster-paced, unfamiliar environment which may mean living in a new city, state or even country; moving away from your friends and family, taking six or seven classes at a time, being responsible for student loans or bills, struggling to decide on a major, etc.

These experiences can be especially hard for students with mental illness, or those who struggle with stress. For these students, college can be less of a fun experience, and more of a contributor to their stress and worries. Sadly, the stress of college can often lead to heightened anxiety and depression, sleeping problems, poor school performance, or more serious issues including drug or alcohol abuse.

Some students even drop out of school entirely. According to a 2011 study from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 62% of students who withdrew from college before graduation did so because of poor mental health.

With the increasing prevalence of anxiety among young adults, mental health is being discussed more than ever before on campuses across the nation. Schools are making changes to accommodate students with mental illness, and help them succeed despite their differences.

Luckily at Wingate University, there are a variety of resources available to help students cope with their problems and be successful. One resource is the counseling services. Students can email the counseling department to set up an appointment to meet with a counselor that fits their schedule.

Students are welcome to discuss a variety of concerns from school, to grades, to social life, and beyond. You are meeting with a trained professional who can listen to your concerns, and help you understand your options.

Other helpful resources include the ARC, or Academic Resource Center. ARC offers tutoring services to all Wingate students, free of charge. You can receive help with studying or doing your homework, which can help improve your grades and give you more confidence in school.

If you are a student with a disability, you can turn to Disability Support Services for accommodations in concern to housing, testing, or other specific services that can help you. There are options to make school more comfortable for you, despite what challenges you may be facing.

If you’re a student struggling with mental illness or stress, you are not alone.In addition to reaching out and talking to a professional, you can also make small lifestyle changes to better your mental state.

  • Try to get enough sleep. It’s really hard when you have classes all day, and work and assignments to do at night, but try and get a twenty or thirty minute nap into your day, or take advantage of the weekends and get some rest.
  • Eat healthy foods, drink water, and exercise. Again, this may require changing your schedule up a bit, but take a few extra minutes a day to think about foods and drinks you’re putting into your body. Also, many studies show that light exercise such as going for a walk, or biking, can reduce stress levels, and improve your grades.
  • Avoid taking on too many responsibilities at once. You are at school to learn. Between academics, clubs, sports, work, homework, studying, and a social life, you can easily become overwhelmed. Evaluate what is really important to you, and try and cut out tasks or activities that stress you out. It’s okay to be human, and have weaknesses. Everybody needs a break sometimes.
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol in excess. They may feel like a temporary way to relax, but overusing drugs and alcohol use can increase stress levels, and result in more problems to face.
  • Know when to ask for help. It can be hard in such a fast-paced society to stop and say “I need help.” However, if you are struggling with self-harm, suicidal thoughts, or any other problems which may threaten your safety, it is important to get help immediately. Listed below are the phone numbers to contact Campus Safety, or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. However, always call 911 in an emergency situation.
  • Remember that it’s okay to be stressed and worried. You aren’t alone, and it’s okay to cut yourself some slack every now and then. Take time to do things that make you happy, and try to cut out negative situations or people who may bring you down.

If you need help with a situation in which counseling services or any of the other resources mentioned above may not be able to help, here are a list of other resources you may turn to, especially if your safety is at risk:

➔ In an emergency situation, always call 911.

➔ Wingate Police (Non-emergency) (704)–233–5657

➔ Campus Safety (704)–233–8999

➔ National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800)-273-8255

Edited by: Brea Childs

 Photo from: Google Images

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WU Alum First to Receive MASM Award

By Adam Riley II, Staff Writer

Wingate alum, Callie Phillips, was presented with the first Master of Arts in Sport Management Distinguished Alumni Award during an expert panel discussing Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence in College Athletics in Austin Auditorium last week.

“No one has to do everything, but everyone can do something to help stop sexual assault and domestic violence,” Phillips said.

She graduated from Wingate in 2013 with her master’s in sport administration and she is the current head volleyball coach at Johnson & Wales University.

Edited By Harrison Taylor, Dustin Kiggins, and Cierra Smith

 

WU Math Ed Majors attend NCCMT Conference

Laura Thompson, Staff Writer

Two Wingate University education majors are attending the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics for professional development experience.

Math professor, Dr. Laora Brizendine,  is taking two students, Matt Pugh and Shannon Moore, to the NCCMT conference. The conference is held annually in Greensboro and is sponsored by the NCCMT. It goes on for two days with sessions about technology in the classrooms.

“The reason that I want the students to go is because there are some sessions for first year teachers,” said Brizendine.

Brizendine said students will learn about some of the issues they may run into in their first, second and third year of teaching.

There are sessions for DESMOS tutorials, graphing calculators and college level math. Brizendine said these are going to be some of the most beneficial sessions for the attending students because it will allow the students to see technology in use.

Wingate students have been going to this conference for four years with Dr. Brizendine and Dr. Sandy Mills, although Mills will not be attending this year. This trip was made possible through a grant that Brizendine wrote and applied for through the Dean’s Office.

One student was surprised to hear that Wingate University offered the opportunity to attend math conferences.  

I am hoping to learn how to use LEGO bricks to teach math, how to connect math with literature and what new technology can help teach math.” said Middle Grades Education major, Matt Pugh.

There are sessions broken down by grade level, which will help guide the student attendees to the sessions that will best interest and benefit them. At the conference, there are also current practicing teachers that will present new ideas about what works best in the classroom.

There will also be several keynote speakers present at the conference,  such as Peg Smith and Jenny Bay Williams. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction will also present on their status and what they are doing.

Edited by Gabriela Cabrera, Ryan Mackintosh, and Mason Teague

WU Looking for New Orientation Coordinators

By Stephen Fisenne, Staff Writer

A meeting was held at Wingate University to find new orientation coordinators and leaders last Wednesday at 6 p.m.

Student Director of Orientation Taylor Rodier said, “It’s a great opportunity because it’s a good summer job and gets you connected to the incoming students.”

In order to get the right staff to welcome the students coming to Wingate next school year, Rodier held a meeting to meet new orientation leaders and coordinators. It was very important to Rodier that they exemplify Wingate in a positive way. The goal of the orientation staff is to welcome the students and make them feel at home.

Apart from making these students feel at home, these positions of leader and coordinator are satisfying for those who fill them. Zac Ezzell, an orientation coordinator from the previous year, said that “the orientation experience, while busy, was one of the most fulfilling parts of my summer.”

Ezzell said that they look for candidates that are energetic and knowledgeable about Wingate so that they can answer questions that the new students may have.

Bryon Ecker, a former orientation leader, talked about the Speak About it program. “I had to help a student through a crisis after the presentation, and it was very rewarding to me that I was able to help them through this difficult time,” said Ecker.

The primary role of a coordinator is to facilitate the new student experience through the orientation leader. Each coordinator has several leaders under them that they manage and guide.

The orientation leaders are the face of the operation that each group of students meet. These leaders are usually the first upperclassmen that the incoming students get to know. It is very important that they are organized and able to take charge in a situation.

The meeting happened in Hayes 209. Look for future opportunities to join the orientation coordinators and leaders.

Edited By Harrison Taylor, Dustin Kiggins, and Cierra Smith 

Lyceum Requirement Changes Cause Confusion, Relief for Many Students

Savanna Harris, Staff Writer

When the word “Lyceum” is mentioned around the Wingate University campus, one would immediately think of a program put into place to enrich students and to broaden their educational experience. It offers students the opportunity to attend for lectures, performances, etc. that they might otherwise not be able to attend.

Even though Lyceums are a graduation requirement, they are not viewed as a burden. In fact, the majority of students get excited when an interesting Lyceum is announced.

Until this year, students were required to attend 40 Lyceums in order to complete the conditions for graduation. At the start of the 2017 school year, however, the requirement was dropped to 24.

Incoming freshmen shared an overall feeling of reprieve in learning this new information, seeing that it made college seem a little less overwhelming. Upperclassmen on the other hand, met the change with a different reaction.

Since they came to Wingate under the 40 Lyceum requirement, it wasn’t clear if the change applied to them too. Dr. Christy Carter, Associate Professor of Biology and Chair of the Lyceum Committee, was able to offer some insight.

As it turns out, the change in the number of required Lyceums applies to EVERYONE, including upperclassman who were enrolled under the original requirement.

The main cause for the change was an overall accommodation issue. With the incoming freshmen class, along with the whole student body, increasing every year, there simply wasn’t enough large areas to seat and host the events in.

Another large factor, Dr. Carter said, was intentionality, and wanting the Lyceum experience to be meaningful and enjoyable rather than oppressive. Commuter and nontraditional students and their unique situations were taken into consideration, as well. “We want students to chose Lyceums they feel they’ll actually get something out of instead of just checking off boxes for a graduation requirement.”

The change was made under the impression that students will be able to get the same benefits from going to 24 Lyceums as they could from going to 40. And thankfully, the changes seem to be a success. “So far, all of the feedback I’ve gotten from students has been good. Some faculty didn’t want the change, but there were enough who did want it for it to happen.”

For now, however, this is the only major change that is being made to the program anytime soon. The categories will remain the same, as well as attendance policies. If any other changes are made soon, they will be mainly for refinement purposes. “I think the Lyceum program should be reevaluated regularly and adapted to current situations on campus,” Dr. Carter said, “so the program will be as beneficial as possible to all who are involved.”

Edited by: Brea Childs

QUESTION OF THE WEEK: Who’s going to win the World Series?

The News Editing class is getting responses to this question from Wingate students this afternoon. After last night’s game the Los Angeles Dodgers and Houston Astros are tied at one win each.

 

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“I know the Astros are definitely going to win. Statistically speaking, it’s time.” — Zac Ezzell, sophomore, Accounting major

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“I’ve never really been a huge baseball fan, but I usually pull for the underdogs. In this world series between the Astros and Dodgers, I’m hoping that the Astros win because this is only their second time being to a world series.” –Ayanna Witherspoon, sophomore, Human Services major

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“I say the Astros (will win). They seem like a great team, who click together as a group. The Dodgers were a little arrogant coming in.” – Robbie Thomas; Junior Math Major

 

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“I think the Dodgers are going to win they seem good this year.” -Stephen Fisenne, Public Relations Senior

 

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“I think the Dodgers are going to win. They have a stocked team. I enjoy it when Clayton Kershaw is pitching the game.”  -Jaleen Miller, Management Sophomore

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“The Astros, they have a higher power offense than the Dodgers do.  The Dodgers have them beat in pitching, but all they really have on offense is Yasiel, Puig, and Turner” – Bruce Booreman, Senior Music Education

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“I think the Dodgers are going to win the World Series.  They have home-field advantage for the series, the best pitcher in the majors with Clayton Kershaw, and a strong offense to help them score runs.”  – Stephen Potter, Senior CCR major

Lyceum preps students for successful interviews

Joanna King, Staff Writer

Going into an interview is all about having a great pair of shoes according to a panel of experts, with 130 years of combined knowledge, who hosted a Lyceum at Wingate University on Monday night.

“You can ruin a good business outfit with shoes that aren’t appropriate,” said panel member Steve Poston, the vice president and athletic director of Wingate University. “If you look like you have been out in the field plowing in the shoes you wear, it will ruin the outfit.”

Poston was one of the five-panel members to in the Lyceum discussion that allowed attending students a glimpse of why what you wear matters when it comes to getting a job. Each individual agreed that it takes only three things to make a good first impression: a nice suit for men, a professional blazer for women and a great pair of shoes are all it takes to make a good first impression.

“Somebody once told me to remember to interview for the job you want, not the job you have,” said Poston.

“It is very important to set yourself apart when making your first impression,” said Lynette Kennedy, a retail business woman for over 20 years. Tahira Stalberte, the assistant superintendent for Union County Public Schools, added onto Kennedy’s statement.

“Even though standing apart is important, make sure you yourself are not a distraction from the interview.”

All five experts agreed a candidate’s interview attire profoundly impacts the employer’s assessment of his qualifications. Kennedy said the employer may even judge a candidate’s character on what he looks like when he walks through the door to an interview.

“They really put an emphasis on first impressions,” Said Sierra Street, a sophomore at Wingate University. “It is very important to remain clean-cut and professional while still standing out enough to make that first impression last.”

Edited by Andrew Elliott and Malik Bledsoe